The MyTrees.com Genealogy and Family History Center Explore the MyTrees.com Forum for your ancestors!

 

Genealogy & Family History
The MyTrees.com Genealogy and Family History Center Explore the MyTrees.com Forum for your ancestors!
Genealogy & Family History
Newsletters
Our Sponsors

Select Newsletter by Issue or Topic:

Genealogy HowTo
Issue: Jun 24, 2012

Something about Mary: On the Biographical Trail of an Elusive Authoress
by Larisa S. Asaeli
, MA in English, PhD Candidate ABD in English with an emphasis in American Women's Literature

My research journey is not typical for genealogists or family historians; it is the journey of a family historian turned scholar. As part of my dissertation research on reform rhetoric I am looking for clues to the mysterious identity of a nineteenth-century Christian novelist, Mary Lund. Eminent scholars in the field of women's rhetorics and literary studies have also searched for details of Mary's life -- and have found nothing beyond the actual books she wrote. What is known about her is that she was a prolific Christian writer of novels and tracts that were popular with Sunday school and temperance societies. She has written at least 40 novels, along with poetry and short stories. After learning about Mary while doing preliminary research for my dissertation, I knew she would be the perfect fit for my project. The mystery that surrounded her identity also intrigued me. I began the hunt for clues about the elusive Mary.

While conducting the research for this recent project, it became clear that today’s scholars frequently depend solely on more familiar academic databases -- and overlook genealogy databases -- when recovering forgotten authors like Mary Lund. However, my knowledge of family history databases allowed me to approach my research subject with different tactics. The exciting journey of discovery follows.

As I said, many of Mary's novels are available through Archive.org and Google books; but I could not find any biographical information about Mary in my initial searches. I desperately needed details on Mary's life as a writer for my dissertation. My advisor suggested I dig deep and find enough to write (and publish) a profile essay. Such an essay would (re)introduce Mary's works to the academic world while sharing the recovery work that will shape my dissertation. So I refocused to think like a scholar and began with a research question: What archive or database would yield the biographical information needed about Mary Lund? And more importantly, which databases had other scholars overlooked? The answer was obvious -- family history databases!

With my background in both academics and family history research, I knew that there must be something about Mary out there. She could not have written multiple novels and not leave some clues to her identity along the way. Following my hunch, I started at FamilySearch.org and typed in Mary's complete maiden name. Within seconds I found a birth record and several census records. There was no doubt that these records correctly identified her because of her unusual birth name. The 1870 census proved to be the most valuable. Mary was listed as living with her parents; her "profession, occupation, or trade" was listed as "authoress"; her "value of personal estate" was $3000 (about $53,000 today); and there was a domestic servant living with the family. All these details connected Mary the authoress to the Mary on the birth record and on the earlier census records. With this simple search I had hit pay dirt – all due to my thinking outside the proverbial box in my research.

Many scholars do not know, as family historians and genealogists do, that this information is readily available through databases like FamilySearch.org or MyTrees.com. And while this information has only recently been made available on the Internet, archives, such as at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, have had Mary's birth record and census records on microfilm for many years. Scholars working on recovering women's writing could have accessed this information many years ago – thankfully today we can access it easily with the touch of a button.

Even with my limited knowledge of these online databases I was able to find some biographical information on Mary. But I knew that there was more out there - I just needed help finding it. So I turned to my good friend, Rae, an advanced family researcher. I gave her Mary's name and the information I had already found. Within three minutes, Rae had found Mary's extracted records of marriage and death, as well as the names of several local histories written about her New England hometown. With the new information she gave me, I began constructing a time line and a family tree for Mary. I wanted to fill in more branches on Mary's family tree so I made a quick search at MyTrees.com. I found some of Mary's cousins. This made Mary seem more real. I began to see her as part of a family. My excitement was growing -- I was like a hound dog following a trail.

I went back to Google rejuvenated and ready to pick up my search. This time I began searching with specific dates and search terms, such as her birth year and hometown. This time I unearthed advertisements, reviews, and holdings for her novels and stories. I was ecstatic! This simple hunch, to look in archives for family history (such as FamilySearch.org and MyTrees.com) and not literary sites, led me to a trail of hundreds of viable Internet sources. As I began reading these reviews and advertisements, I made another important discovery -- additional titles of Mary's books that were not catalogued in WorldCat.org, Google books, or Internet archive. I began to make a list of her published and reviewed titles. The list got longer and longer the more I looked. To date, there are 51 titles on my list comprising novels, pamphlets, and plays.

But I still wanted to know something more about Mary, and the sources I was finding through Google gave few details of her life. Again, thinking like a genealogist, I knew that books written about the places she had lived would provide some biographical information. There were three online versions of local histories written about the three towns in which Mary had lived (ebooks that I found through The Family History Library's catalog). From reading these histories, I discovered some interesting facts about Mary, such as; she was descended from a soldier who fought in the American Revolution; her father was a local government official; and that she was a well-known author in her towns and state. Many women authors during this period wrote anonymously, such as Jane Austen, and therefore did not enjoy any prominence as writers in their lifetimes. But what really got me excited was the "gold nugget" I excavated while reading one of these local histories.

In this history, I discovered a passage that indicated Mary's family moved to Massachusetts in the late 1830s. They relocated in Lowell, Massachusetts, which was a mill town. In this same history, the biographer claimed that Mary had been "connected" with The Lowell Offering, a magazine written by some female mill workers. As a scholar of American literary history I already knew about The Lowell Offering, a detail which made my quest for Mary Lund suddenly have literary merit-that was my gold nugget. Because much research has already been done on the Lowell Mill girls I sensed that there must be something more about Mary available that would "flesh out" the details of her life.

Thanks to my wonderful university librarian, Ammie, I found an excellent website, "Center for Lowell History" an official publication of the University of Massachusetts - Lowell. It was overflowing with information about the mill town and included maps, photographs, histories, and digital copies of The Lowell Offering. Since many of the pieces in the magazine were anonymous I have not yet been able to identify any by Mary. But I have found interesting information about Mary in the Lowell city directories through a link to Archive.org. My search through the city directories began in the late 1830s, when Mary's family moved to Lowell. At first I only found information about her father. I kept on hunting for Mary, and then, BINGO! I found Mary's name in the city directories under schools. Mary had been a teacher at a grammar school and a principal at a middle school. But after two years, she was no longer listed. What had happened, I wondered? Why did she give up teaching? She would not have gone back to the mill. Unfortunately, city directories only give so many biographical details. I still do not know what she was doing during 1856 to 1859, after her teaching career ended but before her first novel was published. And how long was it until she was able to support herself as a writer? These are just a few of the missing details for this elusive author. In spite of what is missing, she is no longer just an author of temperance novels. Mary Lund has developed into a real person for me.

Mary is difficult to trace for other reasons, in spite of a successful career as a writer. Her elusiveness is due to two causes - her gender and her subject matter. As most family historians know, the lives of women are not as well documented as men's. This fact has been reinforced for me as I have looked for biographical clues about Mary. It is not surprising that there are detailed biographies about the men of Newport who were bankers, politicians, or government officials. If Mary is mentioned at all, it is only in a brief paragraph and always in connection to her husband. Women's lives just did not seem worth documenting in local histories that were primarily written by and for men.

The other reason Mary is elusive is due to the focus of her writing on temperance, a reform movement dominated by women. As scholars have pointed out, abolition and temperance "preoccupied the country" in the nineteenth century (Jane Tompkins, Sensational Designs, p. 200). Today such nineteenth-century temperance novels are unfashionable for their didacticism and sentimentality. Instead we read books like Moby Dick and The Scarlet Letter -- books that very few Americans read when they were first published in the 1850s. But because literary historians saw books like these, that were written by men as more "valuable" and worthy of study, women writers like Mary Lund have been ignored, forgotten, or purposely excluded. This makes tracing details of their lives very difficult.

I am still looking for Mary's paper trail. And I am hoping that something will turn up in Newport, New Hampshire, where Mary Lund spent the latter part of her life. I would especially love to find her photo. But since she did not have any children and she didn't marry until she was 55, my chances of finding her personal papers are slim. Thanks to the larger archives, such as FamilySearch.org, MyTrees.com, and Google, I have begun to fill in details of Mary's life. This search however brings up a new question: "How will I ever find the women who did not leave paper trails like Mary? Where can I go to find clues? Should I shift my gaze to other collections, like women's diaries and letters?" But that, gentle readers, is another search for another day for this family historian/scholar.


For more details about the strenuous and strict lives of the Lowell Mill Girls read Lowell Mill Girls by Alice K. Flanagan.
The Lowell Offering: Writings by New England Mill Women (1840-1845) is available in paperback at Amazon.

Newsletters

Select Newsletter by Issue or Topic:

Genealogy HowTo
Issue: Jun 24, 2012

Something about Mary: On the Biographical Trail of an Elusive Authoress
by Larisa S. Asaeli
, MA in English, PhD Candidate ABD in English with an emphasis in American Women's Literature

My research journey is not typical for genealogists or family historians; it is the journey of a family historian turned scholar. As part of my dissertation research on reform rhetoric I am looking for clues to the mysterious identity of a nineteenth-century Christian novelist, Mary Lund. Eminent scholars in the field of women's rhetorics and literary studies have also searched for details of Mary's life -- and have found nothing beyond the actual books she wrote. What is known about her is that she was a prolific Christian writer of novels and tracts that were popular with Sunday school and temperance societies. She has written at least 40 novels, along with poetry and short stories. After learning about Mary while doing preliminary research for my dissertation, I knew she would be the perfect fit for my project. The mystery that surrounded her identity also intrigued me. I began the hunt for clues about the elusive Mary.

While conducting the research for this recent project, it became clear that today’s scholars frequently depend solely on more familiar academic databases -- and overlook genealogy databases -- when recovering forgotten authors like Mary Lund. However, my knowledge of family history databases allowed me to approach my research subject with different tactics. The exciting journey of discovery follows.

As I said, many of Mary's novels are available through Archive.org and Google books; but I could not find any biographical information about Mary in my initial searches. I desperately needed details on Mary's life as a writer for my dissertation. My advisor suggested I dig deep and find enough to write (and publish) a profile essay. Such an essay would (re)introduce Mary's works to the academic world while sharing the recovery work that will shape my dissertation. So I refocused to think like a scholar and began with a research question: What archive or database would yield the biographical information needed about Mary Lund? And more importantly, which databases had other scholars overlooked? The answer was obvious -- family history databases!

With my background in both academics and family history research, I knew that there must be something about Mary out there. She could not have written multiple novels and not leave some clues to her identity along the way. Following my hunch, I started at FamilySearch.org and typed in Mary's complete maiden name. Within seconds I found a birth record and several census records. There was no doubt that these records correctly identified her because of her unusual birth name. The 1870 census proved to be the most valuable. Mary was listed as living with her parents; her "profession, occupation, or trade" was listed as "authoress"; her "value of personal estate" was $3000 (about $53,000 today); and there was a domestic servant living with the family. All these details connected Mary the authoress to the Mary on the birth record and on the earlier census records. With this simple search I had hit pay dirt – all due to my thinking outside the proverbial box in my research.

Many scholars do not know, as family historians and genealogists do, that this information is readily available through databases like FamilySearch.org or MyTrees.com. And while this information has only recently been made available on the Internet, archives, such as at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, have had Mary's birth record and census records on microfilm for many years. Scholars working on recovering women's writing could have accessed this information many years ago – thankfully today we can access it easily with the touch of a button.

Even with my limited knowledge of these online databases I was able to find some biographical information on Mary. But I knew that there was more out there - I just needed help finding it. So I turned to my good friend, Rae, an advanced family researcher. I gave her Mary's name and the information I had already found. Within three minutes, Rae had found Mary's extracted records of marriage and death, as well as the names of several local histories written about her New England hometown. With the new information she gave me, I began constructing a time line and a family tree for Mary. I wanted to fill in more branches on Mary's family tree so I made a quick search at MyTrees.com. I found some of Mary's cousins. This made Mary seem more real. I began to see her as part of a family. My excitement was growing -- I was like a hound dog following a trail.

I went back to Google rejuvenated and ready to pick up my search. This time I began searching with specific dates and search terms, such as her birth year and hometown. This time I unearthed advertisements, reviews, and holdings for her novels and stories. I was ecstatic! This simple hunch, to look in archives for family history (such as FamilySearch.org and MyTrees.com) and not literary sites, led me to a trail of hundreds of viable Internet sources. As I began reading these reviews and advertisements, I made another important discovery -- additional titles of Mary's books that were not catalogued in WorldCat.org, Google books, or Internet archive. I began to make a list of her published and reviewed titles. The list got longer and longer the more I looked. To date, there are 51 titles on my list comprising novels, pamphlets, and plays.

But I still wanted to know something more about Mary, and the sources I was finding through Google gave few details of her life. Again, thinking like a genealogist, I knew that books written about the places she had lived would provide some biographical information. There were three online versions of local histories written about the three towns in which Mary had lived (ebooks that I found through The Family History Library's catalog). From reading these histories, I discovered some interesting facts about Mary, such as; she was descended from a soldier who fought in the American Revolution; her father was a local government official; and that she was a well-known author in her towns and state. Many women authors during this period wrote anonymously, such as Jane Austen, and therefore did not enjoy any prominence as writers in their lifetimes. But what really got me excited was the "gold nugget" I excavated while reading one of these local histories.

In this history, I discovered a passage that indicated Mary's family moved to Massachusetts in the late 1830s. They relocated in Lowell, Massachusetts, which was a mill town. In this same history, the biographer claimed that Mary had been "connected" with The Lowell Offering, a magazine written by some female mill workers. As a scholar of American literary history I already knew about The Lowell Offering, a detail which made my quest for Mary Lund suddenly have literary merit-that was my gold nugget. Because much research has already been done on the Lowell Mill girls I sensed that there must be something more about Mary available that would "flesh out" the details of her life.

Thanks to my wonderful university librarian, Ammie, I found an excellent website, "Center for Lowell History" an official publication of the University of Massachusetts - Lowell. It was overflowing with information about the mill town and included maps, photographs, histories, and digital copies of The Lowell Offering. Since many of the pieces in the magazine were anonymous I have not yet been able to identify any by Mary. But I have found interesting information about Mary in the Lowell city directories through a link to Archive.org. My search through the city directories began in the late 1830s, when Mary's family moved to Lowell. At first I only found information about her father. I kept on hunting for Mary, and then, BINGO! I found Mary's name in the city directories under schools. Mary had been a teacher at a grammar school and a principal at a middle school. But after two years, she was no longer listed. What had happened, I wondered? Why did she give up teaching? She would not have gone back to the mill. Unfortunately, city directories only give so many biographical details. I still do not know what she was doing during 1856 to 1859, after her teaching career ended but before her first novel was published. And how long was it until she was able to support herself as a writer? These are just a few of the missing details for this elusive author. In spite of what is missing, she is no longer just an author of temperance novels. Mary Lund has developed into a real person for me.

Mary is difficult to trace for other reasons, in spite of a successful career as a writer. Her elusiveness is due to two causes - her gender and her subject matter. As most family historians know, the lives of women are not as well documented as men's. This fact has been reinforced for me as I have looked for biographical clues about Mary. It is not surprising that there are detailed biographies about the men of Newport who were bankers, politicians, or government officials. If Mary is mentioned at all, it is only in a brief paragraph and always in connection to her husband. Women's lives just did not seem worth documenting in local histories that were primarily written by and for men.

The other reason Mary is elusive is due to the focus of her writing on temperance, a reform movement dominated by women. As scholars have pointed out, abolition and temperance "preoccupied the country" in the nineteenth century (Jane Tompkins, Sensational Designs, p. 200). Today such nineteenth-century temperance novels are unfashionable for their didacticism and sentimentality. Instead we read books like Moby Dick and The Scarlet Letter -- books that very few Americans read when they were first published in the 1850s. But because literary historians saw books like these, that were written by men as more "valuable" and worthy of study, women writers like Mary Lund have been ignored, forgotten, or purposely excluded. This makes tracing details of their lives very difficult.

I am still looking for Mary's paper trail. And I am hoping that something will turn up in Newport, New Hampshire, where Mary Lund spent the latter part of her life. I would especially love to find her photo. But since she did not have any children and she didn't marry until she was 55, my chances of finding her personal papers are slim. Thanks to the larger archives, such as FamilySearch.org, MyTrees.com, and Google, I have begun to fill in details of Mary's life. This search however brings up a new question: "How will I ever find the women who did not leave paper trails like Mary? Where can I go to find clues? Should I shift my gaze to other collections, like women's diaries and letters?" But that, gentle readers, is another search for another day for this family historian/scholar.


For more details about the strenuous and strict lives of the Lowell Mill Girls read Lowell Mill Girls by Alice K. Flanagan.
The Lowell Offering: Writings by New England Mill Women (1840-1845) is available in paperback at Amazon.

Newsletters

Select Newsletter by Issue or Topic:

Genealogy HowTo
Issue: Jun 24, 2012

Something about Mary: On the Biographical Trail of an Elusive Authoress
by Larisa S. Asaeli
, MA in English, PhD Candidate ABD in English with an emphasis in American Women's Literature

My research journey is not typical for genealogists or family historians; it is the journey of a family historian turned scholar. As part of my dissertation research on reform rhetoric I am looking for clues to the mysterious identity of a nineteenth-century Christian novelist, Mary Lund. Eminent scholars in the field of women's rhetorics and literary studies have also searched for details of Mary's life -- and have found nothing beyond the actual books she wrote. What is known about her is that she was a prolific Christian writer of novels and tracts that were popular with Sunday school and temperance societies. She has written at least 40 novels, along with poetry and short stories. After learning about Mary while doing preliminary research for my dissertation, I knew she would be the perfect fit for my project. The mystery that surrounded her identity also intrigued me. I began the hunt for clues about the elusive Mary.

While conducting the research for this recent project, it became clear that today’s scholars frequently depend solely on more familiar academic databases -- and overlook genealogy databases -- when recovering forgotten authors like Mary Lund. However, my knowledge of family history databases allowed me to approach my research subject with different tactics. The exciting journey of discovery follows.

As I said, many of Mary's novels are available through Archive.org and Google books; but I could not find any biographical information about Mary in my initial searches. I desperately needed details on Mary's life as a writer for my dissertation. My advisor suggested I dig deep and find enough to write (and publish) a profile essay. Such an essay would (re)introduce Mary's works to the academic world while sharing the recovery work that will shape my dissertation. So I refocused to think like a scholar and began with a research question: What archive or database would yield the biographical information needed about Mary Lund? And more importantly, which databases had other scholars overlooked? The answer was obvious -- family history databases!

With my background in both academics and family history research, I knew that there must be something about Mary out there. She could not have written multiple novels and not leave some clues to her identity along the way. Following my hunch, I started at FamilySearch.org and typed in Mary's complete maiden name. Within seconds I found a birth record and several census records. There was no doubt that these records correctly identified her because of her unusual birth name. The 1870 census proved to be the most valuable. Mary was listed as living with her parents; her "profession, occupation, or trade" was listed as "authoress"; her "value of personal estate" was $3000 (about $53,000 today); and there was a domestic servant living with the family. All these details connected Mary the authoress to the Mary on the birth record and on the earlier census records. With this simple search I had hit pay dirt – all due to my thinking outside the proverbial box in my research.

Many scholars do not know, as family historians and genealogists do, that this information is readily available through databases like FamilySearch.org or MyTrees.com. And while this information has only recently been made available on the Internet, archives, such as at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, have had Mary's birth record and census records on microfilm for many years. Scholars working on recovering women's writing could have accessed this information many years ago – thankfully today we can access it easily with the touch of a button.

Even with my limited knowledge of these online databases I was able to find some biographical information on Mary. But I knew that there was more out there - I just needed help finding it. So I turned to my good friend, Rae, an advanced family researcher. I gave her Mary's name and the information I had already found. Within three minutes, Rae had found Mary's extracted records of marriage and death, as well as the names of several local histories written about her New England hometown. With the new information she gave me, I began constructing a time line and a family tree for Mary. I wanted to fill in more branches on Mary's family tree so I made a quick search at MyTrees.com. I found some of Mary's cousins. This made Mary seem more real. I began to see her as part of a family. My excitement was growing -- I was like a hound dog following a trail.

I went back to Google rejuvenated and ready to pick up my search. This time I began searching with specific dates and search terms, such as her birth year and hometown. This time I unearthed advertisements, reviews, and holdings for her novels and stories. I was ecstatic! This simple hunch, to look in archives for family history (such as FamilySearch.org and MyTrees.com) and not literary sites, led me to a trail of hundreds of viable Internet sources. As I began reading these reviews and advertisements, I made another important discovery -- additional titles of Mary's books that were not catalogued in WorldCat.org, Google books, or Internet archive. I began to make a list of her published and reviewed titles. The list got longer and longer the more I looked. To date, there are 51 titles on my list comprising novels, pamphlets, and plays.

But I still wanted to know something more about Mary, and the sources I was finding through Google gave few details of her life. Again, thinking like a genealogist, I knew that books written about the places she had lived would provide some biographical information. There were three online versions of local histories written about the three towns in which Mary had lived (ebooks that I found through The Family History Library's catalog). From reading these histories, I discovered some interesting facts about Mary, such as; she was descended from a soldier who fought in the American Revolution; her father was a local government official; and that she was a well-known author in her towns and state. Many women authors during this period wrote anonymously, such as Jane Austen, and therefore did not enjoy any prominence as writers in their lifetimes. But what really got me excited was the "gold nugget" I excavated while reading one of these local histories.

In this history, I discovered a passage that indicated Mary's family moved to Massachusetts in the late 1830s. They relocated in Lowell, Massachusetts, which was a mill town. In this same history, the biographer claimed that Mary had been "connected" with The Lowell Offering, a magazine written by some female mill workers. As a scholar of American literary history I already knew about The Lowell Offering, a detail which made my quest for Mary Lund suddenly have literary merit-that was my gold nugget. Because much research has already been done on the Lowell Mill girls I sensed that there must be something more about Mary available that would "flesh out" the details of her life.

Thanks to my wonderful university librarian, Ammie, I found an excellent website, "Center for Lowell History" an official publication of the University of Massachusetts - Lowell. It was overflowing with information about the mill town and included maps, photographs, histories, and digital copies of The Lowell Offering. Since many of the pieces in the magazine were anonymous I have not yet been able to identify any by Mary. But I have found interesting information about Mary in the Lowell city directories through a link to Archive.org. My search through the city directories began in the late 1830s, when Mary's family moved to Lowell. At first I only found information about her father. I kept on hunting for Mary, and then, BINGO! I found Mary's name in the city directories under schools. Mary had been a teacher at a grammar school and a principal at a middle school. But after two years, she was no longer listed. What had happened, I wondered? Why did she give up teaching? She would not have gone back to the mill. Unfortunately, city directories only give so many biographical details. I still do not know what she was doing during 1856 to 1859, after her teaching career ended but before her first novel was published. And how long was it until she was able to support herself as a writer? These are just a few of the missing details for this elusive author. In spite of what is missing, she is no longer just an author of temperance novels. Mary Lund has developed into a real person for me.

Mary is difficult to trace for other reasons, in spite of a successful career as a writer. Her elusiveness is due to two causes - her gender and her subject matter. As most family historians know, the lives of women are not as well documented as men's. This fact has been reinforced for me as I have looked for biographical clues about Mary. It is not surprising that there are detailed biographies about the men of Newport who were bankers, politicians, or government officials. If Mary is mentioned at all, it is only in a brief paragraph and always in connection to her husband. Women's lives just did not seem worth documenting in local histories that were primarily written by and for men.

The other reason Mary is elusive is due to the focus of her writing on temperance, a reform movement dominated by women. As scholars have pointed out, abolition and temperance "preoccupied the country" in the nineteenth century (Jane Tompkins, Sensational Designs, p. 200). Today such nineteenth-century temperance novels are unfashionable for their didacticism and sentimentality. Instead we read books like Moby Dick and The Scarlet Letter -- books that very few Americans read when they were first published in the 1850s. But because literary historians saw books like these, that were written by men as more "valuable" and worthy of study, women writers like Mary Lund have been ignored, forgotten, or purposely excluded. This makes tracing details of their lives very difficult.

I am still looking for Mary's paper trail. And I am hoping that something will turn up in Newport, New Hampshire, where Mary Lund spent the latter part of her life. I would especially love to find her photo. But since she did not have any children and she didn't marry until she was 55, my chances of finding her personal papers are slim. Thanks to the larger archives, such as FamilySearch.org, MyTrees.com, and Google, I have begun to fill in details of Mary's life. This search however brings up a new question: "How will I ever find the women who did not leave paper trails like Mary? Where can I go to find clues? Should I shift my gaze to other collections, like women's diaries and letters?" But that, gentle readers, is another search for another day for this family historian/scholar.


For more details about the strenuous and strict lives of the Lowell Mill Girls read Lowell Mill Girls by Alice K. Flanagan.
The Lowell Offering: Writings by New England Mill Women (1840-1845) is available in paperback at Amazon.

Newsletter Signup | My Account | Names Added | Site Map | Our Company
 
Affiliate | Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Terms and Conditions
Copyright © 2017-2019 Fficiency Software, Inc. All rights reserved.