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Genealogy HowTo
Issue: May 4, 2011

8 Tips For a Successful Visit to the Family History Library

Every year about this time my husband and I take a short 2 day trip to the Salt Lake City Family History Center. And every year I search for new ways to get more research done in those 2 days than in the previous year.

On past trips I have often felt overwhelmed by just the thought of the number of resources that were available for me to view. I have found that if I don't prepare myself before visiting the Library the research outcome will not be very productive. Here are some things I do before going to the FHL that have helped me to be more successful.

  • 1. Narrow the research focus to one or two families in a given area.
  • 2. Decide what to discover about these families.
  • 3. Identify records that might be useful using the Library Catalog.
  • 4. Locate the floor on which to find the records.
  • 5. Take a laptop to view and edit your genealogy on MyTrees.com.
  • 6. Take an additional flash drive or blank CDs for making copies.
  • 7. Take some cash for copies.
  • 8. Pack everything in a carry-on upright case on wheels.

Narrow the Research Focus
Last year we focused on my husband's Hefferan ancestors who were British officers serving in India. We were trying to document that they had married East Indian women. Because we kept our focus only to the British Military serving in India we were successful in finding proof of the East Indian heritage on the first day of our trip. We made paper copies of the microfilm documentation because we had forgotten that we could either make a CD of the digital copies or save the images to a flash drive. The paper copies however, have one advantage in that you can easily label them and put other reference notes on them.

The second day we focused on documenting my "Small" family line from Tipton, Indiana. Once again we were able to gather a substantial amount of documentation because we had focused on a specific surname in a specific area.

Decide What to Discover
In the case of the Hefferan ancestors, we had a specific research goal of documenting that these ancestors were married to native East Indian women. Focusing on one research goal contributed significantly to our success.

With the "Small" family line we used a more general approach. We decided to search specifically for cemetery records and biographies that might have been published in county histories or family histories. We copied many Tipton cemetery records that included the surname "Small". We also found and copied many biographies about Tipton pioneers from published local histories that mentioned the "Small" family. I didn't use time at the Library attempting to sort through this documentation. Later however, when we returned to the hotel I was able to see what I had and what I might need to copy the next day.

Identify Useful Records
Before going to the Library use the online Surname Search of the Family History Library Catalog to determine if the surname you are researching has already been researched and the book or resource is in the FHL. By doing this you may get the additional bonus of finding that the book you want to view has already been imaged for online display and can be viewed on your home computer.

Here's how it works.
On the page SEARCH THE FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY CATALOG click the SURNAME SEARCH button.

On the next page that appears enter only one surname in the search box and click "Search." The program will return a list of books or microfilms. When you click one of those links a page will display that will give details about the resource. On some of the resources you will find the statement:"To view a digital version of this item click here." Click the link and a PDF version of the book will display. If this statement is not present and you want to look up the resource at the Library, print out the detail page so you can use it as a reference when you are at the Library. The printout can also serve as a part of your research log on which you have written your notes about the resource.

The Surname Search is especially useful for finding family histories. To find biographies or autobiographies, use the Author Search. You will, of course, need to know at least the author's last name. Probably the most valuable search for finding published genealogies is the Keyword Search. You can type the surname and other keywords into that search. The Keyword Search is especially helpful if you have a very common last name and you need to include a place name. So for instance, in the keyword search I entered "Small Indiana"(without the quotes). This narrowed my search results from 2180 matching titles to 118 matching titles.

While we are discussing how to find references to published family histories and to posted research that others have done, I want to remind everyone that searching MyTrees.com helps you accomplish this important goal. Finding out if a part of your family tree has already been researched by someone else is one of the first steps in researching your genealogy. Many of the family trees at MyTrees.com have been well documented and they usually display contact information for the submitter of the family tree. It is always helpful to find a submitter that you can contact for extra information.

I also suggest that you use the online Library Catalog to determine in advance the microfilms that are available for birth, death, marriage, and cemetery records. On the SEARCH THE FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY CATALOG page click the "Place Search" box. Then on the next screen enter the place you are researching. For instance, I entered Tipton in the first window on the "Place Search" screen and in the second window that is labeled "Part of (optional)" I entered Indiana. Since Tipton is both a county and a city there were 2 options on the next display screen. I selected Tipton, Indiana and the page that displayed had numerous categories available for Tipton County, Indiana. I selected cemeteries and found there were 2 cemetery resources for Tipton County, Indiana. The second resource had the link "To view a digital version of this item click here" and I was able to view and download it to my home computer.

Know Where To Go
Though there are helpful consultants everywhere at the FHL, knowing which floor you want to visit first can save you time. Here is a link to the floor plan for each floor of the FHL. Also this will help you if the copy centers get backed up on one floor. You will know where to go on another floor to make copies.

We usually start on the main floor to research published family histories. Then we go to the third floor to research the US/Canada Reference books, or we go to the other book sections on the International or British floors. Finally we go to the microfilms. We research in this order so we won't miss viewing a book that perhaps can not be microfilmed. Not all of the books can be microfilmed and not all of the resources can be sent to your local Family History Center. However, if you run out of time and don't get to view a microfilm, most microfilms can still be ordered at your local Family History Center for viewing.

Take a Laptop
I take my laptop so I can access my family trees on the MyTrees.com website and can view or edit them if necessary. I also like to use it at the hotel. The FHL and most hotels and motels have free wireless internet access and most laptops come with built-in wireless connectivity. On every floor at the FHL there are tables specifically designed for those patrons that have a portable computer. The only drawback to having your computer with you at the FHL is that you need a helper to watch it while you are getting films or books. If you are going alone to the FHL you may not want to risk taking your laptop. (Or you might consider getting one of those lock-down cables for security.) Fortunately a personal computer is not necessary because the FHL has numerous computers on every floor for your use and lots of consultants to show you how to use them, too.

Take a Flash Drive or Writeable CD
The FHL has upgraded many of their printers and copiers to include the option of copying your documentation to a flash drive or CD instead of making paper copies. And even though copies at the FHL are only 5 cents each, it is still a money and time saver to save to a CD or flash drive, considering that sometimes you have to copy 50 or more pages of a book to get the information you need. Don't hesitate to ask a FHL consultant how to save your copies onto a CD or flash drive or other memory device. If you forget to bring a blank CD, you can purchase one from the Library at a nominal cost.

Take Some Cash for Copies
It still is a good idea to take cash for unexpected paper copies. You will want to print out the FHL catalog detail page for the films you are viewing. As I mentioned earlier, printing the results from your search of the FHL catalog is helpful for research logging and taking notes.

Use a Carry-on Upright Case on Wheels
My husband bought me a carry-on case on wheels with an extendable handle. I can fit my computer, my resource print-outs, my pedigree and family group sheet paper references, snacks and other necessities in the bag. Here is a bag that is similar to the one he got me: Skyway Sigma Carry-On Case

You can lighten your load if you don't take your laptop. Then you will probably only need a small satchel for pens, pencils, paper, print-outs, references, snacks, and other necessities. I bring my own snacks because I have many food allergies. The FHL does have a well stocked vending area for purchasing snacks and there are a few reasonably priced restaurants within walking distance of the FHL.

Warnings and Other Hints

  • 1. Be warned that downtown Salt Lake is under renovation; there is construction everywhere.
  • 2. Don't plan your visit during the first weekend in October and the first weekend in April. That is when the LDS Church holds it's semi-annual general conference. The crowds and traffic are a nightmare.
  • 3. Request "vault" microfilms in advance. It may take the FHL up to three days to get them.
  • 4. When you are at the Library look first at resources listed as "Does not circulate to Family History Centers."
  • 5. Ask a FHL consultant about the free access to certain fee-based websites.
  • 6. View the Monthly Schedule of FHL classes to see if there is one in which you have an interest.
  • 7. If you are staying at a hotel other than the Plaza, which is right next to the FHL, the best place to park is the public parking lot that is adjacent to the Plaza. There is now some public parking in this lot. It costs $8.00 for a day.

I hope these tips will make your next trip to the Salt Lake City Family History Library as successful as mine was.

Copyright ©: 2011 Cindy Carman. All rights reserved.
No printed reproduction of this article may be used without the express written permission of the author. Links to this article are encouraged.

Newsletters

Select Newsletter by Issue or Topic:

Genealogy HowTo
Issue: May 4, 2011

8 Tips For a Successful Visit to the Family History Library

Every year about this time my husband and I take a short 2 day trip to the Salt Lake City Family History Center. And every year I search for new ways to get more research done in those 2 days than in the previous year.

On past trips I have often felt overwhelmed by just the thought of the number of resources that were available for me to view. I have found that if I don't prepare myself before visiting the Library the research outcome will not be very productive. Here are some things I do before going to the FHL that have helped me to be more successful.

  • 1. Narrow the research focus to one or two families in a given area.
  • 2. Decide what to discover about these families.
  • 3. Identify records that might be useful using the Library Catalog.
  • 4. Locate the floor on which to find the records.
  • 5. Take a laptop to view and edit your genealogy on MyTrees.com.
  • 6. Take an additional flash drive or blank CDs for making copies.
  • 7. Take some cash for copies.
  • 8. Pack everything in a carry-on upright case on wheels.

Narrow the Research Focus
Last year we focused on my husband's Hefferan ancestors who were British officers serving in India. We were trying to document that they had married East Indian women. Because we kept our focus only to the British Military serving in India we were successful in finding proof of the East Indian heritage on the first day of our trip. We made paper copies of the microfilm documentation because we had forgotten that we could either make a CD of the digital copies or save the images to a flash drive. The paper copies however, have one advantage in that you can easily label them and put other reference notes on them.

The second day we focused on documenting my "Small" family line from Tipton, Indiana. Once again we were able to gather a substantial amount of documentation because we had focused on a specific surname in a specific area.

Decide What to Discover
In the case of the Hefferan ancestors, we had a specific research goal of documenting that these ancestors were married to native East Indian women. Focusing on one research goal contributed significantly to our success.

With the "Small" family line we used a more general approach. We decided to search specifically for cemetery records and biographies that might have been published in county histories or family histories. We copied many Tipton cemetery records that included the surname "Small". We also found and copied many biographies about Tipton pioneers from published local histories that mentioned the "Small" family. I didn't use time at the Library attempting to sort through this documentation. Later however, when we returned to the hotel I was able to see what I had and what I might need to copy the next day.

Identify Useful Records
Before going to the Library use the online Surname Search of the Family History Library Catalog to determine if the surname you are researching has already been researched and the book or resource is in the FHL. By doing this you may get the additional bonus of finding that the book you want to view has already been imaged for online display and can be viewed on your home computer.

Here's how it works.
On the page SEARCH THE FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY CATALOG click the SURNAME SEARCH button.

On the next page that appears enter only one surname in the search box and click "Search." The program will return a list of books or microfilms. When you click one of those links a page will display that will give details about the resource. On some of the resources you will find the statement:"To view a digital version of this item click here." Click the link and a PDF version of the book will display. If this statement is not present and you want to look up the resource at the Library, print out the detail page so you can use it as a reference when you are at the Library. The printout can also serve as a part of your research log on which you have written your notes about the resource.

The Surname Search is especially useful for finding family histories. To find biographies or autobiographies, use the Author Search. You will, of course, need to know at least the author's last name. Probably the most valuable search for finding published genealogies is the Keyword Search. You can type the surname and other keywords into that search. The Keyword Search is especially helpful if you have a very common last name and you need to include a place name. So for instance, in the keyword search I entered "Small Indiana"(without the quotes). This narrowed my search results from 2180 matching titles to 118 matching titles.

While we are discussing how to find references to published family histories and to posted research that others have done, I want to remind everyone that searching MyTrees.com helps you accomplish this important goal. Finding out if a part of your family tree has already been researched by someone else is one of the first steps in researching your genealogy. Many of the family trees at MyTrees.com have been well documented and they usually display contact information for the submitter of the family tree. It is always helpful to find a submitter that you can contact for extra information.

I also suggest that you use the online Library Catalog to determine in advance the microfilms that are available for birth, death, marriage, and cemetery records. On the SEARCH THE FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY CATALOG page click the "Place Search" box. Then on the next screen enter the place you are researching. For instance, I entered Tipton in the first window on the "Place Search" screen and in the second window that is labeled "Part of (optional)" I entered Indiana. Since Tipton is both a county and a city there were 2 options on the next display screen. I selected Tipton, Indiana and the page that displayed had numerous categories available for Tipton County, Indiana. I selected cemeteries and found there were 2 cemetery resources for Tipton County, Indiana. The second resource had the link "To view a digital version of this item click here" and I was able to view and download it to my home computer.

Know Where To Go
Though there are helpful consultants everywhere at the FHL, knowing which floor you want to visit first can save you time. Here is a link to the floor plan for each floor of the FHL. Also this will help you if the copy centers get backed up on one floor. You will know where to go on another floor to make copies.

We usually start on the main floor to research published family histories. Then we go to the third floor to research the US/Canada Reference books, or we go to the other book sections on the International or British floors. Finally we go to the microfilms. We research in this order so we won't miss viewing a book that perhaps can not be microfilmed. Not all of the books can be microfilmed and not all of the resources can be sent to your local Family History Center. However, if you run out of time and don't get to view a microfilm, most microfilms can still be ordered at your local Family History Center for viewing.

Take a Laptop
I take my laptop so I can access my family trees on the MyTrees.com website and can view or edit them if necessary. I also like to use it at the hotel. The FHL and most hotels and motels have free wireless internet access and most laptops come with built-in wireless connectivity. On every floor at the FHL there are tables specifically designed for those patrons that have a portable computer. The only drawback to having your computer with you at the FHL is that you need a helper to watch it while you are getting films or books. If you are going alone to the FHL you may not want to risk taking your laptop. (Or you might consider getting one of those lock-down cables for security.) Fortunately a personal computer is not necessary because the FHL has numerous computers on every floor for your use and lots of consultants to show you how to use them, too.

Take a Flash Drive or Writeable CD
The FHL has upgraded many of their printers and copiers to include the option of copying your documentation to a flash drive or CD instead of making paper copies. And even though copies at the FHL are only 5 cents each, it is still a money and time saver to save to a CD or flash drive, considering that sometimes you have to copy 50 or more pages of a book to get the information you need. Don't hesitate to ask a FHL consultant how to save your copies onto a CD or flash drive or other memory device. If you forget to bring a blank CD, you can purchase one from the Library at a nominal cost.

Take Some Cash for Copies
It still is a good idea to take cash for unexpected paper copies. You will want to print out the FHL catalog detail page for the films you are viewing. As I mentioned earlier, printing the results from your search of the FHL catalog is helpful for research logging and taking notes.

Use a Carry-on Upright Case on Wheels
My husband bought me a carry-on case on wheels with an extendable handle. I can fit my computer, my resource print-outs, my pedigree and family group sheet paper references, snacks and other necessities in the bag. Here is a bag that is similar to the one he got me: Skyway Sigma Carry-On Case

You can lighten your load if you don't take your laptop. Then you will probably only need a small satchel for pens, pencils, paper, print-outs, references, snacks, and other necessities. I bring my own snacks because I have many food allergies. The FHL does have a well stocked vending area for purchasing snacks and there are a few reasonably priced restaurants within walking distance of the FHL.

Warnings and Other Hints

  • 1. Be warned that downtown Salt Lake is under renovation; there is construction everywhere.
  • 2. Don't plan your visit during the first weekend in October and the first weekend in April. That is when the LDS Church holds it's semi-annual general conference. The crowds and traffic are a nightmare.
  • 3. Request "vault" microfilms in advance. It may take the FHL up to three days to get them.
  • 4. When you are at the Library look first at resources listed as "Does not circulate to Family History Centers."
  • 5. Ask a FHL consultant about the free access to certain fee-based websites.
  • 6. View the Monthly Schedule of FHL classes to see if there is one in which you have an interest.
  • 7. If you are staying at a hotel other than the Plaza, which is right next to the FHL, the best place to park is the public parking lot that is adjacent to the Plaza. There is now some public parking in this lot. It costs $8.00 for a day.

I hope these tips will make your next trip to the Salt Lake City Family History Library as successful as mine was.

Copyright ©: 2011 Cindy Carman. All rights reserved.
No printed reproduction of this article may be used without the express written permission of the author. Links to this article are encouraged.

Newsletters

Select Newsletter by Issue or Topic:

Genealogy HowTo
Issue: May 4, 2011

8 Tips For a Successful Visit to the Family History Library

Every year about this time my husband and I take a short 2 day trip to the Salt Lake City Family History Center. And every year I search for new ways to get more research done in those 2 days than in the previous year.

On past trips I have often felt overwhelmed by just the thought of the number of resources that were available for me to view. I have found that if I don't prepare myself before visiting the Library the research outcome will not be very productive. Here are some things I do before going to the FHL that have helped me to be more successful.

  • 1. Narrow the research focus to one or two families in a given area.
  • 2. Decide what to discover about these families.
  • 3. Identify records that might be useful using the Library Catalog.
  • 4. Locate the floor on which to find the records.
  • 5. Take a laptop to view and edit your genealogy on MyTrees.com.
  • 6. Take an additional flash drive or blank CDs for making copies.
  • 7. Take some cash for copies.
  • 8. Pack everything in a carry-on upright case on wheels.

Narrow the Research Focus
Last year we focused on my husband's Hefferan ancestors who were British officers serving in India. We were trying to document that they had married East Indian women. Because we kept our focus only to the British Military serving in India we were successful in finding proof of the East Indian heritage on the first day of our trip. We made paper copies of the microfilm documentation because we had forgotten that we could either make a CD of the digital copies or save the images to a flash drive. The paper copies however, have one advantage in that you can easily label them and put other reference notes on them.

The second day we focused on documenting my "Small" family line from Tipton, Indiana. Once again we were able to gather a substantial amount of documentation because we had focused on a specific surname in a specific area.

Decide What to Discover
In the case of the Hefferan ancestors, we had a specific research goal of documenting that these ancestors were married to native East Indian women. Focusing on one research goal contributed significantly to our success.

With the "Small" family line we used a more general approach. We decided to search specifically for cemetery records and biographies that might have been published in county histories or family histories. We copied many Tipton cemetery records that included the surname "Small". We also found and copied many biographies about Tipton pioneers from published local histories that mentioned the "Small" family. I didn't use time at the Library attempting to sort through this documentation. Later however, when we returned to the hotel I was able to see what I had and what I might need to copy the next day.

Identify Useful Records
Before going to the Library use the online Surname Search of the Family History Library Catalog to determine if the surname you are researching has already been researched and the book or resource is in the FHL. By doing this you may get the additional bonus of finding that the book you want to view has already been imaged for online display and can be viewed on your home computer.

Here's how it works.
On the page SEARCH THE FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY CATALOG click the SURNAME SEARCH button.

On the next page that appears enter only one surname in the search box and click "Search." The program will return a list of books or microfilms. When you click one of those links a page will display that will give details about the resource. On some of the resources you will find the statement:"To view a digital version of this item click here." Click the link and a PDF version of the book will display. If this statement is not present and you want to look up the resource at the Library, print out the detail page so you can use it as a reference when you are at the Library. The printout can also serve as a part of your research log on which you have written your notes about the resource.

The Surname Search is especially useful for finding family histories. To find biographies or autobiographies, use the Author Search. You will, of course, need to know at least the author's last name. Probably the most valuable search for finding published genealogies is the Keyword Search. You can type the surname and other keywords into that search. The Keyword Search is especially helpful if you have a very common last name and you need to include a place name. So for instance, in the keyword search I entered "Small Indiana"(without the quotes). This narrowed my search results from 2180 matching titles to 118 matching titles.

While we are discussing how to find references to published family histories and to posted research that others have done, I want to remind everyone that searching MyTrees.com helps you accomplish this important goal. Finding out if a part of your family tree has already been researched by someone else is one of the first steps in researching your genealogy. Many of the family trees at MyTrees.com have been well documented and they usually display contact information for the submitter of the family tree. It is always helpful to find a submitter that you can contact for extra information.

I also suggest that you use the online Library Catalog to determine in advance the microfilms that are available for birth, death, marriage, and cemetery records. On the SEARCH THE FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY CATALOG page click the "Place Search" box. Then on the next screen enter the place you are researching. For instance, I entered Tipton in the first window on the "Place Search" screen and in the second window that is labeled "Part of (optional)" I entered Indiana. Since Tipton is both a county and a city there were 2 options on the next display screen. I selected Tipton, Indiana and the page that displayed had numerous categories available for Tipton County, Indiana. I selected cemeteries and found there were 2 cemetery resources for Tipton County, Indiana. The second resource had the link "To view a digital version of this item click here" and I was able to view and download it to my home computer.

Know Where To Go
Though there are helpful consultants everywhere at the FHL, knowing which floor you want to visit first can save you time. Here is a link to the floor plan for each floor of the FHL. Also this will help you if the copy centers get backed up on one floor. You will know where to go on another floor to make copies.

We usually start on the main floor to research published family histories. Then we go to the third floor to research the US/Canada Reference books, or we go to the other book sections on the International or British floors. Finally we go to the microfilms. We research in this order so we won't miss viewing a book that perhaps can not be microfilmed. Not all of the books can be microfilmed and not all of the resources can be sent to your local Family History Center. However, if you run out of time and don't get to view a microfilm, most microfilms can still be ordered at your local Family History Center for viewing.

Take a Laptop
I take my laptop so I can access my family trees on the MyTrees.com website and can view or edit them if necessary. I also like to use it at the hotel. The FHL and most hotels and motels have free wireless internet access and most laptops come with built-in wireless connectivity. On every floor at the FHL there are tables specifically designed for those patrons that have a portable computer. The only drawback to having your computer with you at the FHL is that you need a helper to watch it while you are getting films or books. If you are going alone to the FHL you may not want to risk taking your laptop. (Or you might consider getting one of those lock-down cables for security.) Fortunately a personal computer is not necessary because the FHL has numerous computers on every floor for your use and lots of consultants to show you how to use them, too.

Take a Flash Drive or Writeable CD
The FHL has upgraded many of their printers and copiers to include the option of copying your documentation to a flash drive or CD instead of making paper copies. And even though copies at the FHL are only 5 cents each, it is still a money and time saver to save to a CD or flash drive, considering that sometimes you have to copy 50 or more pages of a book to get the information you need. Don't hesitate to ask a FHL consultant how to save your copies onto a CD or flash drive or other memory device. If you forget to bring a blank CD, you can purchase one from the Library at a nominal cost.

Take Some Cash for Copies
It still is a good idea to take cash for unexpected paper copies. You will want to print out the FHL catalog detail page for the films you are viewing. As I mentioned earlier, printing the results from your search of the FHL catalog is helpful for research logging and taking notes.

Use a Carry-on Upright Case on Wheels
My husband bought me a carry-on case on wheels with an extendable handle. I can fit my computer, my resource print-outs, my pedigree and family group sheet paper references, snacks and other necessities in the bag. Here is a bag that is similar to the one he got me: Skyway Sigma Carry-On Case

You can lighten your load if you don't take your laptop. Then you will probably only need a small satchel for pens, pencils, paper, print-outs, references, snacks, and other necessities. I bring my own snacks because I have many food allergies. The FHL does have a well stocked vending area for purchasing snacks and there are a few reasonably priced restaurants within walking distance of the FHL.

Warnings and Other Hints

  • 1. Be warned that downtown Salt Lake is under renovation; there is construction everywhere.
  • 2. Don't plan your visit during the first weekend in October and the first weekend in April. That is when the LDS Church holds it's semi-annual general conference. The crowds and traffic are a nightmare.
  • 3. Request "vault" microfilms in advance. It may take the FHL up to three days to get them.
  • 4. When you are at the Library look first at resources listed as "Does not circulate to Family History Centers."
  • 5. Ask a FHL consultant about the free access to certain fee-based websites.
  • 6. View the Monthly Schedule of FHL classes to see if there is one in which you have an interest.
  • 7. If you are staying at a hotel other than the Plaza, which is right next to the FHL, the best place to park is the public parking lot that is adjacent to the Plaza. There is now some public parking in this lot. It costs $8.00 for a day.

I hope these tips will make your next trip to the Salt Lake City Family History Library as successful as mine was.

Copyright ©: 2011 Cindy Carman. All rights reserved.
No printed reproduction of this article may be used without the express written permission of the author. Links to this article are encouraged.

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