The MyTrees.com Genealogy and Family History Center Explore the MyTrees.com Forum for your ancestors!

 

Genealogy & Family History
The MyTrees.com Genealogy and Family History Center Explore the MyTrees.com Forum for your ancestors!
Genealogy & Family History
Newsletters
Our Sponsors

Select Newsletter by Issue or Topic:

Genealogy HowTo
Issue: Nov 6, 2010

Capturing the Memories One Question at a Time:
Preserving family history through short video interviews

by Aubrey Fredrickson

Shortly before my husband and I married, my sister sat him down with a video camera for a short interview. Among the questions she asked him were how he had proposed and what he loved most about me. The video was actually intended as part of a bridal shower game, but it became one of the best wedding gifts we received. I imagine that in the years to come this short video interview will be a cherished family keepsake. My husband and I will watch it many years from now and remember the early days of our courtship. Our children and grandchildren will watch it and feel the love that started our family. It will be a memory perfectly preserved. The sound of my husband's voice, the smile on his face, the excitement of those precious days as we prepared for marriage.

As technology becomes more affordable and ever more present in our lives, new avenues of preserving family history are opened to us. Previously, we've published articles on digital photographs, online scrapbooks, oral histories, and digital voice recorders. Each of these tools represents a layer of memories that can be added to our family history, but perhaps the most comprehensive way to record a memory is to preserve it on film. In this article, we'll discuss some easy ways to conduct video interviews with family members.

The One Question Approach

Back in 2007, we talked about conducting oral history interviews with older family members. In that approach, you would carefully construct a list of questions designed to draw out the life history of an individual. You would ask about childhood, adolescence, and adult experiences. This is a fabulous way to capture the life memories of a parent or grandparent and you could easily turn that into a video interview by adding a camcorder.

But what if that just sounds like too big of a project? If you have the time, opportunity, and inclination to complete longer interviews, that's wonderful. If you're hesitant to embark on a project of that scale right now, though, you might want to start smaller--with just one question.

As we move into the holiday season this year, chances are that you'll find yourself at a family gathering in the next few months. This is a great time to get in a few family interviews, but don't worry...It won't take a lot of preparation or even time because you're just going to ask each family member one question. The simplest thing would be to ask every family member the same question, although it may be best to have two or three in mind in case the question doesn't apply to every family member (such as a question about marriage or other life experience that not every family member may have had). Here are some suggestions:

  1. What is your favorite holiday tradition?
  2. Tell me about the first Christmas (or other holiday/occasion) that you remember.
  3. What's the best Christmas (or other holiday/occasion) present that you've ever been given?
  4. What are you most grateful for? (This is a great Thanksgiving question.)
  5. How did you meet your spouse?
  6. What is your favorite memory of your mother/father/grandparent?
  7. What is your full name and how was it chosen for you? (People often have fun stories about where their name came from.)
  8. What do you want to be when you grow up? (This is always a good question for children if you're asking the adults something they wouldn't be able to answer, such as about a spouse.)
  9. What's a goal you have for yourself in the upcoming year? (A good New Years question.)
  10. Tell me about one person who influenced your life (a teacher, friend, etc.)?
Really any question that would encourage your family members to share one experience or story would be ideal for this interviewing technique. You'll want to avoid questions that could be answered in just a word or two. For example, "where were you born" or "what is your full name" would elicit informative, but short and not very interesting answers. Instead, encourage them to tell you about the house/neighborhood/city where they grew up or how their name was chosen for them.

You'll also want to watch out for questions that would have the opposite effect--ones that would lead your relatives into talking extensively about many subjects. Make sure to focus on something specific. "What is your favorite holiday tradition" would be a better question than "how do you celebrate the holidays," which could conceivably lead into them telling you about a variety of traditions for multiple holidays. If some of your relatives are particularly talkative, you may want to set a time limit before you start filming. Remind them that you want to interview everyone, so you're going to try to keep each interview short (maybe three to five minutes).

Getting Ready for the Interviews

So, how much preparation is this going to take? If you've already got a camera, not much at all. You'll want to do four things: check your equipment, pick your question(s), pick your location, and let your family know. It'll probably take you less than an hour to do all this.

  • First, check your equipment. Pull out your camera and do a quick test. Make sure it's working and that the video and sound quality is good. It's important that when all the interviews are done, you can see and hear your family members as they respond. It's also good to make sure you know how to operate the camera, especially if it's new. If you're going to be using a tripod or microphone, make sure to try those out as well.

  • Second, pick your question(s). Decide if you're going to ask everyone the same question, or if you're going to have two or three questions. Keep in mind the ages and situations of the family members you'll be interviewing. If some of them are children, you may need a special question for them. Also, keep in mind that some subjects may be sensitive to certain family members. A cousin who never knew his or her parents might find a question about their mother a difficult one. You can still ask the question of your other family members, but have a substitute ready just in case.

  • Third, pick your location. The general location of the interviews will most likely be determined by where the family gathering is being held. But taking that into consideration, decide exactly where you want to do the interviews. If the gathering is being held at someone else's house, check with the host to make sure that there will be a room you can use. There are some things you'll want to think about when picking a location. First, noise. Family gatherings can be loud. You'll want to hold the interviews in a quiet location, probably a room where the door can be closed to block out background noise. For this reason, inside is usually better than outside. Bright lights or cluttered furniture can be distracting, both during the interview and later when you're watching the film. So, if possible, try to choose a simple, calm room (or at least a room at that has a simple, calm wall to use a backdrop).

  • Fourth, let your family know. It's a good idea to put the word out about your interviews beforehand. You might want to send out an email or make a few phone calls to tell your family members what you're planning and why. This will give them a chance to prepare a well thought out answer. Also, letting them know ahead of time can help you overcome any reluctance some family members may feel about being interviewed. Sometimes being interviewed, and particularly if a video camera is involved, can make us feel shy or self-conscious. Let your family know why you're doing the interviews (to preserve family memories). Tell them why you chose the particular question you want to ask. Finally, make sure to emphasize that it will be short and painless.
Equipment and Editing Software

Now we'll talk about what you'll need to actually record the interviews and edit the film to create a truly beautiful piece of family history. The most important piece of equipment is, of course, a video camera.

Video cameras are all around us these days. Many cell phones and digital cameras are capable of recording at least a few minutes of video, although the quality of these recordings (particularly sound quality) might not be the best. However, if that's all you have and you don't want to buy a camcorder right now, I say use what you've got. Just keep in mind that you may not be able to interview more than one or two people at a time before downloading the file and clearing your camera's memory.

If you're interested in purchasing a camcorder, the good news is that they're more affordable and more compact than ever--perfect for carrying along to a family get together. One fairly new product that can make family interviews really easy is the Flip Mino Video Camera. This pocket-size camcorder can record up to 60 minutes of video and includes built-in software that allows you to edit video files and upload them to video sharing sites. It can also connect to your TV for instant viewing, if your family is eager to see the results. This is the older model of this product and is currently selling for $133.14 on Amazon. The newer model is more expensive, but can record up to two hours and has some added features.

There are a lot of camcorders out there, so we suggest you do a little research before making a purchase. For some ideas on what to look for, check out this About.com article on buying a video camera.

Some additional equipment you might want to consider purchasing would be a tripod and a microphone. A tripod helps to stabilize your video, getting rid of the wobbliness that is the curse of home videos. A separate microphone can be a good investment if you are unhappy with the sound quality produced by the camcorder itself, especially for interviews, where it's so important to catch every word.

The final step of your interview project will be, of course, editing and sharing the footage. Some cameras may come with software that allows you to edit the video on your computer. One thing to keep in mind as your doing your interviews is that shorter clips are easier to edit. Generally, a new video clip will be started whenever you push the record button on your camera. If you're doing the one question approach, just make sure to stop recording after every separate interview. That way, you'll start a new clip with each relative.

If your camera doesn't come with video editing software, you may already have someone your computer. Most new PCs will come with Windows' Movie Maker and new Macs generally come with iMovie. These basic video editing programs will allow you to take all your separate video clips and put them together in one great movie. You can even add still photos, music, or narration. For some other options, see this article on free video editing software. If you're interested in buying a software package to get more robust features and a more professional looking outcome, check out Corel VideoStudio Pro X2.

So, don't forgot--family interviews don't have to be big and time consuming. Just take a short break from your holiday celebrations this year to ask one question. Capture it on film and you'll have a keepsake that your whole family will love. The result can be shared by burning the video onto a DVD or by uploading it online to YouTube or another media sharing site. Give your family a holiday gift that they'll treasure forever this year--the gift of memories.

Article written by Aubrey Fredrickson

Copyright ©: 2011 Fficiency Software, Inc. All rights reserved.
No reproduction of this article may be used without the express written permission of the author.

Newsletters

Select Newsletter by Issue or Topic:

Genealogy HowTo
Issue: Nov 6, 2010

Capturing the Memories One Question at a Time:
Preserving family history through short video interviews

by Aubrey Fredrickson

Shortly before my husband and I married, my sister sat him down with a video camera for a short interview. Among the questions she asked him were how he had proposed and what he loved most about me. The video was actually intended as part of a bridal shower game, but it became one of the best wedding gifts we received. I imagine that in the years to come this short video interview will be a cherished family keepsake. My husband and I will watch it many years from now and remember the early days of our courtship. Our children and grandchildren will watch it and feel the love that started our family. It will be a memory perfectly preserved. The sound of my husband's voice, the smile on his face, the excitement of those precious days as we prepared for marriage.

As technology becomes more affordable and ever more present in our lives, new avenues of preserving family history are opened to us. Previously, we've published articles on digital photographs, online scrapbooks, oral histories, and digital voice recorders. Each of these tools represents a layer of memories that can be added to our family history, but perhaps the most comprehensive way to record a memory is to preserve it on film. In this article, we'll discuss some easy ways to conduct video interviews with family members.

The One Question Approach

Back in 2007, we talked about conducting oral history interviews with older family members. In that approach, you would carefully construct a list of questions designed to draw out the life history of an individual. You would ask about childhood, adolescence, and adult experiences. This is a fabulous way to capture the life memories of a parent or grandparent and you could easily turn that into a video interview by adding a camcorder.

But what if that just sounds like too big of a project? If you have the time, opportunity, and inclination to complete longer interviews, that's wonderful. If you're hesitant to embark on a project of that scale right now, though, you might want to start smaller--with just one question.

As we move into the holiday season this year, chances are that you'll find yourself at a family gathering in the next few months. This is a great time to get in a few family interviews, but don't worry...It won't take a lot of preparation or even time because you're just going to ask each family member one question. The simplest thing would be to ask every family member the same question, although it may be best to have two or three in mind in case the question doesn't apply to every family member (such as a question about marriage or other life experience that not every family member may have had). Here are some suggestions:

  1. What is your favorite holiday tradition?
  2. Tell me about the first Christmas (or other holiday/occasion) that you remember.
  3. What's the best Christmas (or other holiday/occasion) present that you've ever been given?
  4. What are you most grateful for? (This is a great Thanksgiving question.)
  5. How did you meet your spouse?
  6. What is your favorite memory of your mother/father/grandparent?
  7. What is your full name and how was it chosen for you? (People often have fun stories about where their name came from.)
  8. What do you want to be when you grow up? (This is always a good question for children if you're asking the adults something they wouldn't be able to answer, such as about a spouse.)
  9. What's a goal you have for yourself in the upcoming year? (A good New Years question.)
  10. Tell me about one person who influenced your life (a teacher, friend, etc.)?
Really any question that would encourage your family members to share one experience or story would be ideal for this interviewing technique. You'll want to avoid questions that could be answered in just a word or two. For example, "where were you born" or "what is your full name" would elicit informative, but short and not very interesting answers. Instead, encourage them to tell you about the house/neighborhood/city where they grew up or how their name was chosen for them.

You'll also want to watch out for questions that would have the opposite effect--ones that would lead your relatives into talking extensively about many subjects. Make sure to focus on something specific. "What is your favorite holiday tradition" would be a better question than "how do you celebrate the holidays," which could conceivably lead into them telling you about a variety of traditions for multiple holidays. If some of your relatives are particularly talkative, you may want to set a time limit before you start filming. Remind them that you want to interview everyone, so you're going to try to keep each interview short (maybe three to five minutes).

Getting Ready for the Interviews

So, how much preparation is this going to take? If you've already got a camera, not much at all. You'll want to do four things: check your equipment, pick your question(s), pick your location, and let your family know. It'll probably take you less than an hour to do all this.

  • First, check your equipment. Pull out your camera and do a quick test. Make sure it's working and that the video and sound quality is good. It's important that when all the interviews are done, you can see and hear your family members as they respond. It's also good to make sure you know how to operate the camera, especially if it's new. If you're going to be using a tripod or microphone, make sure to try those out as well.

  • Second, pick your question(s). Decide if you're going to ask everyone the same question, or if you're going to have two or three questions. Keep in mind the ages and situations of the family members you'll be interviewing. If some of them are children, you may need a special question for them. Also, keep in mind that some subjects may be sensitive to certain family members. A cousin who never knew his or her parents might find a question about their mother a difficult one. You can still ask the question of your other family members, but have a substitute ready just in case.

  • Third, pick your location. The general location of the interviews will most likely be determined by where the family gathering is being held. But taking that into consideration, decide exactly where you want to do the interviews. If the gathering is being held at someone else's house, check with the host to make sure that there will be a room you can use. There are some things you'll want to think about when picking a location. First, noise. Family gatherings can be loud. You'll want to hold the interviews in a quiet location, probably a room where the door can be closed to block out background noise. For this reason, inside is usually better than outside. Bright lights or cluttered furniture can be distracting, both during the interview and later when you're watching the film. So, if possible, try to choose a simple, calm room (or at least a room at that has a simple, calm wall to use a backdrop).

  • Fourth, let your family know. It's a good idea to put the word out about your interviews beforehand. You might want to send out an email or make a few phone calls to tell your family members what you're planning and why. This will give them a chance to prepare a well thought out answer. Also, letting them know ahead of time can help you overcome any reluctance some family members may feel about being interviewed. Sometimes being interviewed, and particularly if a video camera is involved, can make us feel shy or self-conscious. Let your family know why you're doing the interviews (to preserve family memories). Tell them why you chose the particular question you want to ask. Finally, make sure to emphasize that it will be short and painless.
Equipment and Editing Software

Now we'll talk about what you'll need to actually record the interviews and edit the film to create a truly beautiful piece of family history. The most important piece of equipment is, of course, a video camera.

Video cameras are all around us these days. Many cell phones and digital cameras are capable of recording at least a few minutes of video, although the quality of these recordings (particularly sound quality) might not be the best. However, if that's all you have and you don't want to buy a camcorder right now, I say use what you've got. Just keep in mind that you may not be able to interview more than one or two people at a time before downloading the file and clearing your camera's memory.

If you're interested in purchasing a camcorder, the good news is that they're more affordable and more compact than ever--perfect for carrying along to a family get together. One fairly new product that can make family interviews really easy is the Flip Mino Video Camera. This pocket-size camcorder can record up to 60 minutes of video and includes built-in software that allows you to edit video files and upload them to video sharing sites. It can also connect to your TV for instant viewing, if your family is eager to see the results. This is the older model of this product and is currently selling for $133.14 on Amazon. The newer model is more expensive, but can record up to two hours and has some added features.

There are a lot of camcorders out there, so we suggest you do a little research before making a purchase. For some ideas on what to look for, check out this About.com article on buying a video camera.

Some additional equipment you might want to consider purchasing would be a tripod and a microphone. A tripod helps to stabilize your video, getting rid of the wobbliness that is the curse of home videos. A separate microphone can be a good investment if you are unhappy with the sound quality produced by the camcorder itself, especially for interviews, where it's so important to catch every word.

The final step of your interview project will be, of course, editing and sharing the footage. Some cameras may come with software that allows you to edit the video on your computer. One thing to keep in mind as your doing your interviews is that shorter clips are easier to edit. Generally, a new video clip will be started whenever you push the record button on your camera. If you're doing the one question approach, just make sure to stop recording after every separate interview. That way, you'll start a new clip with each relative.

If your camera doesn't come with video editing software, you may already have someone your computer. Most new PCs will come with Windows' Movie Maker and new Macs generally come with iMovie. These basic video editing programs will allow you to take all your separate video clips and put them together in one great movie. You can even add still photos, music, or narration. For some other options, see this article on free video editing software. If you're interested in buying a software package to get more robust features and a more professional looking outcome, check out Corel VideoStudio Pro X2.

So, don't forgot--family interviews don't have to be big and time consuming. Just take a short break from your holiday celebrations this year to ask one question. Capture it on film and you'll have a keepsake that your whole family will love. The result can be shared by burning the video onto a DVD or by uploading it online to YouTube or another media sharing site. Give your family a holiday gift that they'll treasure forever this year--the gift of memories.

Article written by Aubrey Fredrickson

Copyright ©: 2011 Fficiency Software, Inc. All rights reserved.
No reproduction of this article may be used without the express written permission of the author.

Newsletters

Select Newsletter by Issue or Topic:

Genealogy HowTo
Issue: Nov 6, 2010

Capturing the Memories One Question at a Time:
Preserving family history through short video interviews

by Aubrey Fredrickson

Shortly before my husband and I married, my sister sat him down with a video camera for a short interview. Among the questions she asked him were how he had proposed and what he loved most about me. The video was actually intended as part of a bridal shower game, but it became one of the best wedding gifts we received. I imagine that in the years to come this short video interview will be a cherished family keepsake. My husband and I will watch it many years from now and remember the early days of our courtship. Our children and grandchildren will watch it and feel the love that started our family. It will be a memory perfectly preserved. The sound of my husband's voice, the smile on his face, the excitement of those precious days as we prepared for marriage.

As technology becomes more affordable and ever more present in our lives, new avenues of preserving family history are opened to us. Previously, we've published articles on digital photographs, online scrapbooks, oral histories, and digital voice recorders. Each of these tools represents a layer of memories that can be added to our family history, but perhaps the most comprehensive way to record a memory is to preserve it on film. In this article, we'll discuss some easy ways to conduct video interviews with family members.

The One Question Approach

Back in 2007, we talked about conducting oral history interviews with older family members. In that approach, you would carefully construct a list of questions designed to draw out the life history of an individual. You would ask about childhood, adolescence, and adult experiences. This is a fabulous way to capture the life memories of a parent or grandparent and you could easily turn that into a video interview by adding a camcorder.

But what if that just sounds like too big of a project? If you have the time, opportunity, and inclination to complete longer interviews, that's wonderful. If you're hesitant to embark on a project of that scale right now, though, you might want to start smaller--with just one question.

As we move into the holiday season this year, chances are that you'll find yourself at a family gathering in the next few months. This is a great time to get in a few family interviews, but don't worry...It won't take a lot of preparation or even time because you're just going to ask each family member one question. The simplest thing would be to ask every family member the same question, although it may be best to have two or three in mind in case the question doesn't apply to every family member (such as a question about marriage or other life experience that not every family member may have had). Here are some suggestions:

  1. What is your favorite holiday tradition?
  2. Tell me about the first Christmas (or other holiday/occasion) that you remember.
  3. What's the best Christmas (or other holiday/occasion) present that you've ever been given?
  4. What are you most grateful for? (This is a great Thanksgiving question.)
  5. How did you meet your spouse?
  6. What is your favorite memory of your mother/father/grandparent?
  7. What is your full name and how was it chosen for you? (People often have fun stories about where their name came from.)
  8. What do you want to be when you grow up? (This is always a good question for children if you're asking the adults something they wouldn't be able to answer, such as about a spouse.)
  9. What's a goal you have for yourself in the upcoming year? (A good New Years question.)
  10. Tell me about one person who influenced your life (a teacher, friend, etc.)?
Really any question that would encourage your family members to share one experience or story would be ideal for this interviewing technique. You'll want to avoid questions that could be answered in just a word or two. For example, "where were you born" or "what is your full name" would elicit informative, but short and not very interesting answers. Instead, encourage them to tell you about the house/neighborhood/city where they grew up or how their name was chosen for them.

You'll also want to watch out for questions that would have the opposite effect--ones that would lead your relatives into talking extensively about many subjects. Make sure to focus on something specific. "What is your favorite holiday tradition" would be a better question than "how do you celebrate the holidays," which could conceivably lead into them telling you about a variety of traditions for multiple holidays. If some of your relatives are particularly talkative, you may want to set a time limit before you start filming. Remind them that you want to interview everyone, so you're going to try to keep each interview short (maybe three to five minutes).

Getting Ready for the Interviews

So, how much preparation is this going to take? If you've already got a camera, not much at all. You'll want to do four things: check your equipment, pick your question(s), pick your location, and let your family know. It'll probably take you less than an hour to do all this.

  • First, check your equipment. Pull out your camera and do a quick test. Make sure it's working and that the video and sound quality is good. It's important that when all the interviews are done, you can see and hear your family members as they respond. It's also good to make sure you know how to operate the camera, especially if it's new. If you're going to be using a tripod or microphone, make sure to try those out as well.

  • Second, pick your question(s). Decide if you're going to ask everyone the same question, or if you're going to have two or three questions. Keep in mind the ages and situations of the family members you'll be interviewing. If some of them are children, you may need a special question for them. Also, keep in mind that some subjects may be sensitive to certain family members. A cousin who never knew his or her parents might find a question about their mother a difficult one. You can still ask the question of your other family members, but have a substitute ready just in case.

  • Third, pick your location. The general location of the interviews will most likely be determined by where the family gathering is being held. But taking that into consideration, decide exactly where you want to do the interviews. If the gathering is being held at someone else's house, check with the host to make sure that there will be a room you can use. There are some things you'll want to think about when picking a location. First, noise. Family gatherings can be loud. You'll want to hold the interviews in a quiet location, probably a room where the door can be closed to block out background noise. For this reason, inside is usually better than outside. Bright lights or cluttered furniture can be distracting, both during the interview and later when you're watching the film. So, if possible, try to choose a simple, calm room (or at least a room at that has a simple, calm wall to use a backdrop).

  • Fourth, let your family know. It's a good idea to put the word out about your interviews beforehand. You might want to send out an email or make a few phone calls to tell your family members what you're planning and why. This will give them a chance to prepare a well thought out answer. Also, letting them know ahead of time can help you overcome any reluctance some family members may feel about being interviewed. Sometimes being interviewed, and particularly if a video camera is involved, can make us feel shy or self-conscious. Let your family know why you're doing the interviews (to preserve family memories). Tell them why you chose the particular question you want to ask. Finally, make sure to emphasize that it will be short and painless.
Equipment and Editing Software

Now we'll talk about what you'll need to actually record the interviews and edit the film to create a truly beautiful piece of family history. The most important piece of equipment is, of course, a video camera.

Video cameras are all around us these days. Many cell phones and digital cameras are capable of recording at least a few minutes of video, although the quality of these recordings (particularly sound quality) might not be the best. However, if that's all you have and you don't want to buy a camcorder right now, I say use what you've got. Just keep in mind that you may not be able to interview more than one or two people at a time before downloading the file and clearing your camera's memory.

If you're interested in purchasing a camcorder, the good news is that they're more affordable and more compact than ever--perfect for carrying along to a family get together. One fairly new product that can make family interviews really easy is the Flip Mino Video Camera. This pocket-size camcorder can record up to 60 minutes of video and includes built-in software that allows you to edit video files and upload them to video sharing sites. It can also connect to your TV for instant viewing, if your family is eager to see the results. This is the older model of this product and is currently selling for $133.14 on Amazon. The newer model is more expensive, but can record up to two hours and has some added features.

There are a lot of camcorders out there, so we suggest you do a little research before making a purchase. For some ideas on what to look for, check out this About.com article on buying a video camera.

Some additional equipment you might want to consider purchasing would be a tripod and a microphone. A tripod helps to stabilize your video, getting rid of the wobbliness that is the curse of home videos. A separate microphone can be a good investment if you are unhappy with the sound quality produced by the camcorder itself, especially for interviews, where it's so important to catch every word.

The final step of your interview project will be, of course, editing and sharing the footage. Some cameras may come with software that allows you to edit the video on your computer. One thing to keep in mind as your doing your interviews is that shorter clips are easier to edit. Generally, a new video clip will be started whenever you push the record button on your camera. If you're doing the one question approach, just make sure to stop recording after every separate interview. That way, you'll start a new clip with each relative.

If your camera doesn't come with video editing software, you may already have someone your computer. Most new PCs will come with Windows' Movie Maker and new Macs generally come with iMovie. These basic video editing programs will allow you to take all your separate video clips and put them together in one great movie. You can even add still photos, music, or narration. For some other options, see this article on free video editing software. If you're interested in buying a software package to get more robust features and a more professional looking outcome, check out Corel VideoStudio Pro X2.

So, don't forgot--family interviews don't have to be big and time consuming. Just take a short break from your holiday celebrations this year to ask one question. Capture it on film and you'll have a keepsake that your whole family will love. The result can be shared by burning the video onto a DVD or by uploading it online to YouTube or another media sharing site. Give your family a holiday gift that they'll treasure forever this year--the gift of memories.

Article written by Aubrey Fredrickson

Copyright ©: 2011 Fficiency Software, Inc. All rights reserved.
No reproduction of this article may be used without the express written permission of the author.

Newsletter Signup | My Account | Names Added | Site Map | Our Company
 
Affiliate | Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Terms and Conditions
Copyright © 2017-2019 Fficiency Software, Inc. All rights reserved.