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Genealogy HowTo
Issue: Jun 26, 2010

Putting Together a Great Family Reunion

by Aubrey Fredrickson
Welcome to summer and all the fun of gardening, sitting out in the sun, and...family reunions! Reunions are genealogy in the making. Not only do they provide an opportunity to bond with family members and make wonderful memories, but they can also be a great way to connect with past generations by sharing your precious genealogical finds. How can you do all this? MyTrees.com has some wonderful tools to help you make the most out of this summer's reunion.

Before the Reunion

Got stuck with planning this year's shindig? Not to worry! Planning a reunion can be a big job, but there's plenty of information out there to help you get through it. In our November 2007 issue, we included an article on "Getting Together: Planning Your Family Reunion." This article breaks the planning process down into five manageable steps. First, it focuses on making the initial big decisions, such as location and budget. Next, it talks about how to get your family involved in the planning process. (Just remember, you don't have to do it all yourself!) The third step is keeping your family informed. Fourth, plan activities that will interest everyone in the family. Finally, the fifth step is to find ways to involve your ancestors in the festivities as well.

To read the complete article, click here.

The "Getting Together" article is a good starting place, but if you still need some help with the planning, check out the Organizing Reunions section of our Online Store. There you'll find several books that we recommend for information and tools to help you create the perfect family reunion. For example, "Family reunion" by Jennifer Crichton includes a wealth of planning information, such as how to cook for large groups, activities to interest kids and adults, how to record events, and a lot more. If you find a book that sounds interesting in the Online Store, just click the title to see a full description and customer reviews.

Getting Kids Involved

As I mentioned, one of the important steps in planning a family reunion is to make sure you have activities that will interest everyone. One of the challenges you may face as you try to work a family history slant to events is how to get the kids involved. Children probably won't be very interested in pedigree charts, but they'll certainly be interested in their family history if it's presented in the right way. In our May 2008 issue, Cindy Carman answered the question, "How can parents get kids excited about genealogy?" As you plan your family reunion, you may want to use this article for ideas about how to get the kids interested and involved in family history. A couple of the ideas shared in this article were to help children photograph or make a rubbing of an ancestor's tombstone or to create a personalized Coat of Arms for your family.

For more fun and creative ideas to help kids feel involved, read the complete article.

Our Online Store also has a section devoted to Genealogy for Kids. This section includes books like "Creating Jr. Genealogists" by Karen Frisch Dennen. This book suggests ways for genealogists to help the children in their families develop an appreciation for their heritage, while creating treasured memories in the process. To read descriptions and reviews for this book, as well as others, visit our Online Store.

After the Reunion

Since we're genealogists, there's a very good chance that we'll use any family reunion as an opportunity to add to our store of family history. Getting the whole family together is a great time to pool our wealth of family facts and lore. Did you record information for the newest members of the family? Gain some valuable information about Grandma's line from another genealogist in the family? Did you use the reunion as an opportunity to go through some old family papers and identify old photos? Hopefully, you documented any and all of your new discoveries. But when the reunion is over, what are you going to do with all that information?

In July 2001, Karen Clifford, AG, FUGA, contributed an article about how to use MyTrees.com to update and share your information called "Sharing the Bounties of Your Garden with Others". She discusses uploading your new information to MyTrees.com so that you can use our Family Access feature to share pictures, stories, and other information with your family. The Family Access allows your family members to not only view your file, but download the information as well, so it can be a handy way to distribute any data you collected at the reunion.

To read the full article, click here.

And if your family is anything like mine, you'll probably end up with a lot of pictures by the end of your reunion. You can share those pictures using the Family Access, read Karen Clifford's article to learn how. For more ideas about how to organize and share your pictures, check out "Organizing Your Digital Pictures" and "Online Scrapbooking and Your Family Tree".

As you plan this summer's, or next summer's, family reunion, we hope some of these articles and books will be able to take some of anxiety from the stressful planning. For another fun idea for a summer project, see our article in this issue about conducting family interviews. And if you have a success story from a previous family reunion where you made an interesting family history connection or discovery, email it to us at newsletter@mytrees.com for inclusion in the Your Stories section of our next issue.

Article written by Aubrey Fredrickson

Copyright ©: 2011 Fficiency Software, Inc. All rights reserved.
No reproduction of this article may be used without the express written permission of the author.

Newsletters

Select Newsletter by Issue or Topic:

Genealogy HowTo
Issue: Jun 26, 2010

Putting Together a Great Family Reunion

by Aubrey Fredrickson
Welcome to summer and all the fun of gardening, sitting out in the sun, and...family reunions! Reunions are genealogy in the making. Not only do they provide an opportunity to bond with family members and make wonderful memories, but they can also be a great way to connect with past generations by sharing your precious genealogical finds. How can you do all this? MyTrees.com has some wonderful tools to help you make the most out of this summer's reunion.

Before the Reunion

Got stuck with planning this year's shindig? Not to worry! Planning a reunion can be a big job, but there's plenty of information out there to help you get through it. In our November 2007 issue, we included an article on "Getting Together: Planning Your Family Reunion." This article breaks the planning process down into five manageable steps. First, it focuses on making the initial big decisions, such as location and budget. Next, it talks about how to get your family involved in the planning process. (Just remember, you don't have to do it all yourself!) The third step is keeping your family informed. Fourth, plan activities that will interest everyone in the family. Finally, the fifth step is to find ways to involve your ancestors in the festivities as well.

To read the complete article, click here.

The "Getting Together" article is a good starting place, but if you still need some help with the planning, check out the Organizing Reunions section of our Online Store. There you'll find several books that we recommend for information and tools to help you create the perfect family reunion. For example, "Family reunion" by Jennifer Crichton includes a wealth of planning information, such as how to cook for large groups, activities to interest kids and adults, how to record events, and a lot more. If you find a book that sounds interesting in the Online Store, just click the title to see a full description and customer reviews.

Getting Kids Involved

As I mentioned, one of the important steps in planning a family reunion is to make sure you have activities that will interest everyone. One of the challenges you may face as you try to work a family history slant to events is how to get the kids involved. Children probably won't be very interested in pedigree charts, but they'll certainly be interested in their family history if it's presented in the right way. In our May 2008 issue, Cindy Carman answered the question, "How can parents get kids excited about genealogy?" As you plan your family reunion, you may want to use this article for ideas about how to get the kids interested and involved in family history. A couple of the ideas shared in this article were to help children photograph or make a rubbing of an ancestor's tombstone or to create a personalized Coat of Arms for your family.

For more fun and creative ideas to help kids feel involved, read the complete article.

Our Online Store also has a section devoted to Genealogy for Kids. This section includes books like "Creating Jr. Genealogists" by Karen Frisch Dennen. This book suggests ways for genealogists to help the children in their families develop an appreciation for their heritage, while creating treasured memories in the process. To read descriptions and reviews for this book, as well as others, visit our Online Store.

After the Reunion

Since we're genealogists, there's a very good chance that we'll use any family reunion as an opportunity to add to our store of family history. Getting the whole family together is a great time to pool our wealth of family facts and lore. Did you record information for the newest members of the family? Gain some valuable information about Grandma's line from another genealogist in the family? Did you use the reunion as an opportunity to go through some old family papers and identify old photos? Hopefully, you documented any and all of your new discoveries. But when the reunion is over, what are you going to do with all that information?

In July 2001, Karen Clifford, AG, FUGA, contributed an article about how to use MyTrees.com to update and share your information called "Sharing the Bounties of Your Garden with Others". She discusses uploading your new information to MyTrees.com so that you can use our Family Access feature to share pictures, stories, and other information with your family. The Family Access allows your family members to not only view your file, but download the information as well, so it can be a handy way to distribute any data you collected at the reunion.

To read the full article, click here.

And if your family is anything like mine, you'll probably end up with a lot of pictures by the end of your reunion. You can share those pictures using the Family Access, read Karen Clifford's article to learn how. For more ideas about how to organize and share your pictures, check out "Organizing Your Digital Pictures" and "Online Scrapbooking and Your Family Tree".

As you plan this summer's, or next summer's, family reunion, we hope some of these articles and books will be able to take some of anxiety from the stressful planning. For another fun idea for a summer project, see our article in this issue about conducting family interviews. And if you have a success story from a previous family reunion where you made an interesting family history connection or discovery, email it to us at newsletter@mytrees.com for inclusion in the Your Stories section of our next issue.

Article written by Aubrey Fredrickson

Copyright ©: 2011 Fficiency Software, Inc. All rights reserved.
No reproduction of this article may be used without the express written permission of the author.

Newsletters

Select Newsletter by Issue or Topic:

Genealogy HowTo
Issue: Jun 26, 2010

Putting Together a Great Family Reunion

by Aubrey Fredrickson
Welcome to summer and all the fun of gardening, sitting out in the sun, and...family reunions! Reunions are genealogy in the making. Not only do they provide an opportunity to bond with family members and make wonderful memories, but they can also be a great way to connect with past generations by sharing your precious genealogical finds. How can you do all this? MyTrees.com has some wonderful tools to help you make the most out of this summer's reunion.

Before the Reunion

Got stuck with planning this year's shindig? Not to worry! Planning a reunion can be a big job, but there's plenty of information out there to help you get through it. In our November 2007 issue, we included an article on "Getting Together: Planning Your Family Reunion." This article breaks the planning process down into five manageable steps. First, it focuses on making the initial big decisions, such as location and budget. Next, it talks about how to get your family involved in the planning process. (Just remember, you don't have to do it all yourself!) The third step is keeping your family informed. Fourth, plan activities that will interest everyone in the family. Finally, the fifth step is to find ways to involve your ancestors in the festivities as well.

To read the complete article, click here.

The "Getting Together" article is a good starting place, but if you still need some help with the planning, check out the Organizing Reunions section of our Online Store. There you'll find several books that we recommend for information and tools to help you create the perfect family reunion. For example, "Family reunion" by Jennifer Crichton includes a wealth of planning information, such as how to cook for large groups, activities to interest kids and adults, how to record events, and a lot more. If you find a book that sounds interesting in the Online Store, just click the title to see a full description and customer reviews.

Getting Kids Involved

As I mentioned, one of the important steps in planning a family reunion is to make sure you have activities that will interest everyone. One of the challenges you may face as you try to work a family history slant to events is how to get the kids involved. Children probably won't be very interested in pedigree charts, but they'll certainly be interested in their family history if it's presented in the right way. In our May 2008 issue, Cindy Carman answered the question, "How can parents get kids excited about genealogy?" As you plan your family reunion, you may want to use this article for ideas about how to get the kids interested and involved in family history. A couple of the ideas shared in this article were to help children photograph or make a rubbing of an ancestor's tombstone or to create a personalized Coat of Arms for your family.

For more fun and creative ideas to help kids feel involved, read the complete article.

Our Online Store also has a section devoted to Genealogy for Kids. This section includes books like "Creating Jr. Genealogists" by Karen Frisch Dennen. This book suggests ways for genealogists to help the children in their families develop an appreciation for their heritage, while creating treasured memories in the process. To read descriptions and reviews for this book, as well as others, visit our Online Store.

After the Reunion

Since we're genealogists, there's a very good chance that we'll use any family reunion as an opportunity to add to our store of family history. Getting the whole family together is a great time to pool our wealth of family facts and lore. Did you record information for the newest members of the family? Gain some valuable information about Grandma's line from another genealogist in the family? Did you use the reunion as an opportunity to go through some old family papers and identify old photos? Hopefully, you documented any and all of your new discoveries. But when the reunion is over, what are you going to do with all that information?

In July 2001, Karen Clifford, AG, FUGA, contributed an article about how to use MyTrees.com to update and share your information called "Sharing the Bounties of Your Garden with Others". She discusses uploading your new information to MyTrees.com so that you can use our Family Access feature to share pictures, stories, and other information with your family. The Family Access allows your family members to not only view your file, but download the information as well, so it can be a handy way to distribute any data you collected at the reunion.

To read the full article, click here.

And if your family is anything like mine, you'll probably end up with a lot of pictures by the end of your reunion. You can share those pictures using the Family Access, read Karen Clifford's article to learn how. For more ideas about how to organize and share your pictures, check out "Organizing Your Digital Pictures" and "Online Scrapbooking and Your Family Tree".

As you plan this summer's, or next summer's, family reunion, we hope some of these articles and books will be able to take some of anxiety from the stressful planning. For another fun idea for a summer project, see our article in this issue about conducting family interviews. And if you have a success story from a previous family reunion where you made an interesting family history connection or discovery, email it to us at newsletter@mytrees.com for inclusion in the Your Stories section of our next issue.

Article written by Aubrey Fredrickson

Copyright ©: 2011 Fficiency Software, Inc. All rights reserved.
No reproduction of this article may be used without the express written permission of the author.

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