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Genealogy HowTo
Issue: Mar 31, 2010

Book review of Eyewitness to the Civil War: The Complete History from Secession to Reconstruction, by Stephen G. Hyslop, Ed. by Neil Kagan.
Review written by Larisa S. Asaeli
Hardcover: 416 pages; Online Price: $26.40 on Amazon

If such a book had been available for my 8th grade US History class, I might have listened better to Mrs. Preston's lessons about the American Civil War. It is the personal aspects of history that have always fascinated me, which is perhaps why I love doing genealogical research. If you are like me, more interested in people than battles and troop movements, then Eyewitness to the Civil War is the perfect book to complete your personal family history library. Published by the National Geographic Society, this book details the critical years leading up to, including, and after the American Civil War, with the major emphasis on the years 1861-1865. Stunning visually and content rich, this coffee-table book is not one that will sit gathering dust.

Eyewitness to the Civil War, while it details the major battles of the war, it is really about the people who were in and influenced by the war. Their letters, diaries, photos, memoirs, newspaper articles, maps, and souvenirs--the material artifacts that the war produced--are the focus of the book. In his introduction, Harris J. Andrews points out that such "surviving writings offer an intimate look into the first-hand experiences of soldiers and civilians seldom found in formal histories." Along with written records, the visuals, especially photographs, played an important role in documenting the war. Huge collections were amassed by photographers like Mathew Brady and later acquired by the U.S. government and now reside in the Library of Congress and the National Archives. Sketch artists and engravers were also crucial in telling the story of the war. Since the technology to print photographs was not yet available, it was up to the engravers to tell the visual story from the battle front. Also, soldiers and citizens kept detailed diaries and journals that often included illustrations that complement our knowledge of the war. And lastly, the map makers drew more than 24,000 maps for the Union Army alone. Relics and mementos such as uniforms, flags, cannons, and statues have also survived. All of these artifacts allow 21st-century readers to "experience the extraordinary events of the American Civil War" through a new and visually-rich text.

Each chapter includes five major parts: a narrative that gives the history of the period; a brief chronology that outlines important dates; eyewitness accounts from letters, diaries, and memoirs; maps hand drawn during the battles; and picture essays. All of these different parts allow readers to skim through the text quickly for a pictorial story, or to read in greater detail about such events as the battles, spies, and riots. Such a format will engage readers of different interest levels and ages.

The Prologue examines the tensions between what Stephen G. Hyslop describes as the "urban and industrialized North and the largely rural South with its plantation economy." The issues of states' rights vs. the federal government and the issue of slavery led to the split between the two halves of the nation. Also, contention over slavery in the new western states added fuel to the fire. Hyslop's discussion of important players such as Preston Brooks, Charles Sumner, John Brown, and Dred Scott show how tempers were rising high when Abraham Lincoln campaigned for President on the eve of the Civil War. Hyslop also gives a few details about women's contributions, specifically in the abolitionist cause and important works such as Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) and Harriet Jacobs' memoir Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861). The chapter ends with a stunning graphic photo essay on slavery that includes photos of slaves, whips, metal collars, and reward posters. All these images illustrate the degradation suffered by more than four million slaves when the war began in 1861.

Chapter 1 "1861: First Blood" details the War's beginning with Union forces taking over Fort Sumter in South Carolina. By February, seven states had seceded (South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas) and the Confederate States had chosen a president, Jefferson Davis. All this happened even before Abraham Lincoln had been sworn in as president in March. The attack on Fort Sumter came in April when Unionists refused to surrender. These events are brought to life with visuals and eyewitness accounts. Mary Boykin Miller Chestnut's firsthand account of the attack on Fort Sumter adds richness to the narrative but also proves the value of personal records when writing about historical events. A map by Robert Knox Sneden and photos of Fort Sumter round out the narrative, as does a stunning color-photo essay of ambrotypes and tintypes of Union and Confederate soldiers.

The chapter continues with details about more Southern states seceding (Arkansas, Tennessee, North Carolina, and Virginia) and state militias called up in the North. The early battles at Bull Run and Manassas are given visual heft with a moving personal letter written by Major Sullivan Ballou to his wife, Sarah, before his death. He tells her--"when my last breath escapes me on the battle field, it will whisper your name"--illustrating the terrible human cost of the war.

The chapter ends with a photo essay of soldiers' outfits for both North and South, which included: uniforms, gear, hats, shoes, buttons, shirts, socks, jackets, coats, armaments, bibles, wallets, blankets, bullets, and sewing kits. All these images are shown in full color and rich detail.

Chapter 2 "1862: Total War" shows the visually grim realities of war, the death and destruction wrecked on both sides. Hyslop says that in April "far more Americans were killed or wounded in two days of fighting at Shiloh [Tennessee] than had fallen in battle during the entire Revolutionary War." The horrors of these deaths were brought home to citizens by the photographs taken on the battlefield, something new for 19th-century Americans. The total dead was almost 3,600 and the wounded were over 16,000, making it "the bloodiest battle yet fought on American soil."

Along with photos, readers can see detailed maps, engravings, and paintings of the war in all its phases; on land, on sea, in open fields, and in the military forts. This chapter also includes a vignette of blockaders, focusing on Raphael Semmes, who attacked US merchants and navy ships for the Confederacy. Aided by the British, he eventually captured ships and cargo worth more than $6 million. Characters like Semmes, and the stories of women like Union Nurse Clara Barton, along with photos and other material artifacts, make this book a fascinating resource for family historians.

The Emancipation Proclamation was signed in 1862 and enacted into law on New Year's Day 1863. And yet before his election, President Lincoln was not an abolitionist. But once he was elected, he became more sympathetic to the plight of slaves and eventually became the "Great Emancipator" that we remember him as today. Hyslop calls 1862 the "year of trials" for Lincoln. Indeed, he was haunted his entire presidency by death threats and a feeling of foreboding about his own death, all explored in a detailed photo essay at the end of chapter 5.

The battle of Fredericksburg in December claimed the lives of nearly 2,000 soldiers, with many more wounded (detailed figures of killed, wounded, and missing are included for all battles in the book's appendix).

Chapter 3 "1863-Victory or Death" shows how the year began with "a lull between storms" since the two armies were tired, diseased, malnourished, and suffering from exposure. But by the year's end, battles such as Vicksburg, Mississippi "tipped the scales" in favor of the Union. The accounts of two women, Alice Shirley and Lucy McCrae, show the terrible cost of war for civilians and give added intensity to the battle's narrative.

At the end of January 1863 over 25,000 Union troops had deserted due to the terrible living conditions. When President Lincoln replaced General Burnside with Joseph Hooker the camps were cleaned up, living conditions were improved, rations increased, and security was enforced. As a result morale increased and soldiers were ready for another year of battle. All this information is supported with photos of the camp, the soldiers, and Hooker himself. Another striking photo in this section is of the three Chitwood brothers from Georgia, their arms linked and each brandishing a pistol and Bowie knife. One brother died and the other two were captured. Such a photo reminds us that the war was about people and families, just as much as it was a war of ideals.

The eyewitness account of Mary Anna Morrison Jackson of her husband's death--Lieutenant General "Stonewall" Thomas J. Jackson--also shows the terrible human suffering that occurred during the war. Her moving account is full of personal pathos about the bare facts of a soldier's death after pneumonia and the amputation of his left arm. Her husband's last words, "Let us cross over the river and rest under the shade of the trees" show the humanity and religious devotion of one of the war's most fearsome soldiers. Hand-drawn maps, paintings, and photos show the details of the Battle of Chancellorsville where "Stonewall" Jackson was fatally wounded.

The next major battle to be described is the famous battle at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. A computer rendered map shows the movements of both Union and Confederate forces from Fredericksburg, Virginia northward to the battlefield of Gettysburg. The battle took place on July 1-3 and was described by a Union soldier as "a perfect hell on earth" -- a fact attested to by the photos, sketches, and paintings surrounding the narrative. One such photo is of John Burns, who became famous as "the only civilian known to have fought at Gettysburg." He was a "72-year-old veteran of the War of 1812" who survived the Battle of Gettysburg and became a national hero. Small vignettes like this one are what make Eyewitness to the Civil War such a valuable book for genealogists and historians alike.

A section in the chapter focuses on the "War on the Home Front" and looks at the chaos caused in New York City due to the conscription of soldiers for the Union Army. There were problems since the wealthy could purchase a substitute for $300, and many felt poor immigrants, especially the Irish, were being forced into a war to "win freedom for blacks, who could then compete with them economically" by taking their jobs for a lower wage. Such feelings boiled over into a riot in July 1863. Poor blacks were the principal victims and suffered stonings, beatings, and lynchings. The police could not contain the violence and eventually Federal troops were brought in to quell the riots. 400 were dead or injured before the rioting stopped.

Southerners also had problems drafting soldiers and eventually had to change eligibility ages from 18- 35 to 17-50 and do away with substitutions and exemptions. Many Confederate soldiers were also deserting to merely support their families. Others were tired of the war and turned to pillaging and looting, though nothing compared to the New York City riots. Southern women showed their displeasure with the Confederate government by participating in bread riots. Hyslop points out that "by 1863, prices in the South had increased eightfold since the beginning of the war" and women were tired of it. As a result they would do a smash-and-grab at bakeries in the large cities.

But the largest group of resisters was the emancipated slaves who began to leave their masters. They began new lives of freedom as independent workers, started businesses, enlisted in the Union army, or went to school. A photo essay of "The Glory Regiment" illustrates the impact 200,000 African American soldiers had in the Union cause. Their story inspired the 1989 film Glory based on "the failed attack on Fort Wagner, South Carolina."

The dissent at this time also spurred a general lawlessness that led to gruesome attacks on Lawrence, Kansas by William Quantrell and his gang; Jesse James, Bloody Bill Anderson, and Cole and Jim Younger. Such bushwhacking was a symptom of the bloody conflict between North and South and continued even after the War's end.

The battle of Chickamauga, September 19-20, was "one of the bloodiest battles of the war." Photos, engravings, and paintings of soldiers -- along with eyewitness accounts -- round out the horrific narrative. Especially interesting is a sidebar about little Johnny Clem who joined the 22nd Michigan infantry band as a drummer. He "became the Union's darling when the press touted his exploits at Chickamauga." Johnny supposedly shot a Confederate soldier in self defense and was made a sergeant, given a silver medal, and "remained in the army for half a century" retiring as a major general at age 65.

The narrative of the Battle of Chattanooga is fleshed out by a hand-drawn map by Robert Knox Sneden, a painting, a sketch, and two photos. One photo is of a young soldier, battle hero Arthur MacArthur, Jr., father of famous General Douglas MacArthur--perfectly illustrating why this book is useful for family history research.

A photo essay, "The Cavalryman's Flair," ends the chapter with full-body shot photos of two cavalrymen: the dandy Union soldier George Armstrong Custer and Confederate John Singleton Mosby. The Cavalryman, according to Hyslop, "considered himself the heir to a knightly tradition-- dashing, gallant, and fearless." They were especially efficient soldiers because they became a hybrid of two European soldier models: "the classical light cavalry and the heavily armed dragoon" that could both scout and fight. Such efficiency is proven by photos of soldiers and their horses, along with photos of flags, hats, gauntlets, saddles, spurs and weapons (revolvers, rifles, and sabers).

Chapter 4 "1864-Rebels Under Siege" focuses on the battles and careers of Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant, specifically their campaign of the Wilderness in Virginia. The chapter includes photos of both generals, photos of their soldiers, officers, and battle sites, along with sketches and hand-drawn maps. Also photos of handmade fortifications or dugouts known as Fort Sedgewick and a pontoon bridge spanning 2,100 feet of the James River show the ingenuity of the Union Army and the technological innovation that resulted from the War.

The next portion of the chapter focuses on General William Sherman's campaign into Georgia, all documented with photos. He left troops along the way to protect railroad supply lines from Confederate soldiers. Maps and eyewitness accounts show the horrifying human cost for the Union's campaign in Georgia. One poignant account by Wallace P. Reed details how a day of "artillery fire" killed people indiscriminately as they ate breakfast, walked to work, or did their ironing. And yet "from a military standpoint these were no results worthy of mention."

The last section of the chapter details how the war was affecting President Lincoln and the politics in Washington. A political cartoon indicates visually Lincoln's supposed doubts about re-election. But the Union victory at Atlanta raised Lincoln's and the Union's hopes for a victory. However, in the midst of this positive note for the Union, a photo essay shows the terrible price prisoners of war paid, especially in the confederate camp of Andersonville. It was so unhealthy and inhumane that 13,000 of 33,000 Union prisoners died there from disease and malnutrition. Conditions were so bad that the camp commander, Captain Henry Wirz, "became the war's only figure executed for war crimes." But that essay and the single photo are nothing compared to the photo essay, "The Medical Middle Ages," that details battlefield surgery and hospital care. A photo of a surgeon's tool kit, full of saws and hammers, a photo of an amputation in progress, recovering and mutilated amputees, and a photo of sawed-off feet show clearly that "the power to heal was nowhere close to the power to maim." There was minimal understanding of sanitation, nutrition, germs or infection at this time. Surprisingly, in spite of the butchery of amputation, "only 14 percent of Federal soldiers died from their wounds, and 18 percent of Confederates...disease killed twice as many combatants." Hyslop points out that the war's "three main killers were diarrhea and dysentery, typhoid, and pneumonia, with malaria fourth." Fortunately advances in nursing were made thanks to women like Clara Barton, Dorothea Dix, Kate Cumming, Sally Tomkins, and Louisa May Alcott. These volunteers were soon preferred nurses by military doctors and their work "paved the way for nursing to become a legitimate profession for women after the war." The photos of these women and the hospitals they ran show that the war was being fought by women as well as men.

Chapter 5 "1865-The Final Act" rehearses the waning days and final battles of the Union and Confederate troops. The capture of Fort Fisher in North Carolina by Union troops effectively won the war since the Confederacy was cut off from their last supply point. Photos of the battle, along with those of the decimated Fort Sumter and burnt out Richmond, Virginia show the devastating cost of war. A poignant painting of General Lee's signing of the articles of surrender delivered by Grant and his aides on April 9 rounds out the narrative of the war's conclusion, as does a pencil sketch of President Jefferson Davis in prison.

The chapter ends with a content-rich photo essay, "The Assassination of Lincoln." Photos of himself, his hat, engravings of the assassination at the theater, a wanted poster, photos of the funeral procession, along with photos of the conspirators and their hangings bring this horrendous event to life for readers. It also proves again why this book is especially appropriate for a varied reading audience.

The Epilogue, "The Nation Reunited," examines how the whole nation was in chaos and had to put itself back together. The South was put under military rule and Vice President Andrew Johnson, Lincoln's successor, had to battle Congress continually as the government began reconstruction. The Congress countermanded many of his legislative acts with their own that protected newly-won liberties for all citizens. They set up the Freedmen's Bureau, which helped blacks and whites alike. Eventually Johnson's pro-states' rights and anti-freed slaves attitude led to his impeachment by Congress in February 1868. He escaped conviction by one vote.

Ulysses S. Grant easily won the presidential campaign that year and under his guidance African Americans in the South were slowly able to vote and improve their lives. Unfortunately, the Klu Klux Klan grew also and kept assaulting and dragging down the newly-freed citizens. The photos of the KKK show just how intimidating they could be. And yet there was an optimism after the war that led to westward expansion, especially by African Americans. Unfortunately, the reconstruction promoted by Grant ended when Rutherford B. Hayes became president in 1877. A photo essay at the end of the chapter tells what happened to several of the major players after the war, including Mary Lincoln.

The fabulous Appendices add to this book's value. "Casualties of War" gives a map and lists of the numbers of killed, wounded, and missing soldiers for both armies. For the entire war it was 364,000 Union soldiers and for the Confederacy it was 260,000, or 10% of the white male population. "Selected Milestones" gives a brief factual overview of the war; a "Vocabulary of War" explains key terms; "Additional Reading" lists over 100 hundred secondary texts on the Civil War; and a detailed index finishes the text.

While I find this book to be a good value for its price and also a helpful source for family historians, I must warn readers that it appears to favor the Union cause and story. For Southerners and researchers in Southern genealogy, keeping this bias in mind may be helpful. Also, while much of the written text is available for perusal on Google Books, only the photos on the dust jacket are visible. If you want to see photos from the book itself, you will need to find it at your local library or bookstore. Also of interest, there is a link from the Google Books page to Civil War videos on the History.com website.

Article written by Larisa S. Asaeli

Copyright : 2011 Fficiency Software, Inc. All rights reserved.
No reproduction of this article may be used without the express written permission of the author.

Newsletters

Select Newsletter by Issue or Topic:

Genealogy HowTo
Issue: Mar 31, 2010

Book review of Eyewitness to the Civil War: The Complete History from Secession to Reconstruction, by Stephen G. Hyslop, Ed. by Neil Kagan.
Review written by Larisa S. Asaeli
Hardcover: 416 pages; Online Price: $26.40 on Amazon

If such a book had been available for my 8th grade US History class, I might have listened better to Mrs. Preston's lessons about the American Civil War. It is the personal aspects of history that have always fascinated me, which is perhaps why I love doing genealogical research. If you are like me, more interested in people than battles and troop movements, then Eyewitness to the Civil War is the perfect book to complete your personal family history library. Published by the National Geographic Society, this book details the critical years leading up to, including, and after the American Civil War, with the major emphasis on the years 1861-1865. Stunning visually and content rich, this coffee-table book is not one that will sit gathering dust.

Eyewitness to the Civil War, while it details the major battles of the war, it is really about the people who were in and influenced by the war. Their letters, diaries, photos, memoirs, newspaper articles, maps, and souvenirs--the material artifacts that the war produced--are the focus of the book. In his introduction, Harris J. Andrews points out that such "surviving writings offer an intimate look into the first-hand experiences of soldiers and civilians seldom found in formal histories." Along with written records, the visuals, especially photographs, played an important role in documenting the war. Huge collections were amassed by photographers like Mathew Brady and later acquired by the U.S. government and now reside in the Library of Congress and the National Archives. Sketch artists and engravers were also crucial in telling the story of the war. Since the technology to print photographs was not yet available, it was up to the engravers to tell the visual story from the battle front. Also, soldiers and citizens kept detailed diaries and journals that often included illustrations that complement our knowledge of the war. And lastly, the map makers drew more than 24,000 maps for the Union Army alone. Relics and mementos such as uniforms, flags, cannons, and statues have also survived. All of these artifacts allow 21st-century readers to "experience the extraordinary events of the American Civil War" through a new and visually-rich text.

Each chapter includes five major parts: a narrative that gives the history of the period; a brief chronology that outlines important dates; eyewitness accounts from letters, diaries, and memoirs; maps hand drawn during the battles; and picture essays. All of these different parts allow readers to skim through the text quickly for a pictorial story, or to read in greater detail about such events as the battles, spies, and riots. Such a format will engage readers of different interest levels and ages.

The Prologue examines the tensions between what Stephen G. Hyslop describes as the "urban and industrialized North and the largely rural South with its plantation economy." The issues of states' rights vs. the federal government and the issue of slavery led to the split between the two halves of the nation. Also, contention over slavery in the new western states added fuel to the fire. Hyslop's discussion of important players such as Preston Brooks, Charles Sumner, John Brown, and Dred Scott show how tempers were rising high when Abraham Lincoln campaigned for President on the eve of the Civil War. Hyslop also gives a few details about women's contributions, specifically in the abolitionist cause and important works such as Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) and Harriet Jacobs' memoir Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861). The chapter ends with a stunning graphic photo essay on slavery that includes photos of slaves, whips, metal collars, and reward posters. All these images illustrate the degradation suffered by more than four million slaves when the war began in 1861.

Chapter 1 "1861: First Blood" details the War's beginning with Union forces taking over Fort Sumter in South Carolina. By February, seven states had seceded (South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas) and the Confederate States had chosen a president, Jefferson Davis. All this happened even before Abraham Lincoln had been sworn in as president in March. The attack on Fort Sumter came in April when Unionists refused to surrender. These events are brought to life with visuals and eyewitness accounts. Mary Boykin Miller Chestnut's firsthand account of the attack on Fort Sumter adds richness to the narrative but also proves the value of personal records when writing about historical events. A map by Robert Knox Sneden and photos of Fort Sumter round out the narrative, as does a stunning color-photo essay of ambrotypes and tintypes of Union and Confederate soldiers.

The chapter continues with details about more Southern states seceding (Arkansas, Tennessee, North Carolina, and Virginia) and state militias called up in the North. The early battles at Bull Run and Manassas are given visual heft with a moving personal letter written by Major Sullivan Ballou to his wife, Sarah, before his death. He tells her--"when my last breath escapes me on the battle field, it will whisper your name"--illustrating the terrible human cost of the war.

The chapter ends with a photo essay of soldiers' outfits for both North and South, which included: uniforms, gear, hats, shoes, buttons, shirts, socks, jackets, coats, armaments, bibles, wallets, blankets, bullets, and sewing kits. All these images are shown in full color and rich detail.

Chapter 2 "1862: Total War" shows the visually grim realities of war, the death and destruction wrecked on both sides. Hyslop says that in April "far more Americans were killed or wounded in two days of fighting at Shiloh [Tennessee] than had fallen in battle during the entire Revolutionary War." The horrors of these deaths were brought home to citizens by the photographs taken on the battlefield, something new for 19th-century Americans. The total dead was almost 3,600 and the wounded were over 16,000, making it "the bloodiest battle yet fought on American soil."

Along with photos, readers can see detailed maps, engravings, and paintings of the war in all its phases; on land, on sea, in open fields, and in the military forts. This chapter also includes a vignette of blockaders, focusing on Raphael Semmes, who attacked US merchants and navy ships for the Confederacy. Aided by the British, he eventually captured ships and cargo worth more than $6 million. Characters like Semmes, and the stories of women like Union Nurse Clara Barton, along with photos and other material artifacts, make this book a fascinating resource for family historians.

The Emancipation Proclamation was signed in 1862 and enacted into law on New Year's Day 1863. And yet before his election, President Lincoln was not an abolitionist. But once he was elected, he became more sympathetic to the plight of slaves and eventually became the "Great Emancipator" that we remember him as today. Hyslop calls 1862 the "year of trials" for Lincoln. Indeed, he was haunted his entire presidency by death threats and a feeling of foreboding about his own death, all explored in a detailed photo essay at the end of chapter 5.

The battle of Fredericksburg in December claimed the lives of nearly 2,000 soldiers, with many more wounded (detailed figures of killed, wounded, and missing are included for all battles in the book's appendix).

Chapter 3 "1863-Victory or Death" shows how the year began with "a lull between storms" since the two armies were tired, diseased, malnourished, and suffering from exposure. But by the year's end, battles such as Vicksburg, Mississippi "tipped the scales" in favor of the Union. The accounts of two women, Alice Shirley and Lucy McCrae, show the terrible cost of war for civilians and give added intensity to the battle's narrative.

At the end of January 1863 over 25,000 Union troops had deserted due to the terrible living conditions. When President Lincoln replaced General Burnside with Joseph Hooker the camps were cleaned up, living conditions were improved, rations increased, and security was enforced. As a result morale increased and soldiers were ready for another year of battle. All this information is supported with photos of the camp, the soldiers, and Hooker himself. Another striking photo in this section is of the three Chitwood brothers from Georgia, their arms linked and each brandishing a pistol and Bowie knife. One brother died and the other two were captured. Such a photo reminds us that the war was about people and families, just as much as it was a war of ideals.

The eyewitness account of Mary Anna Morrison Jackson of her husband's death--Lieutenant General "Stonewall" Thomas J. Jackson--also shows the terrible human suffering that occurred during the war. Her moving account is full of personal pathos about the bare facts of a soldier's death after pneumonia and the amputation of his left arm. Her husband's last words, "Let us cross over the river and rest under the shade of the trees" show the humanity and religious devotion of one of the war's most fearsome soldiers. Hand-drawn maps, paintings, and photos show the details of the Battle of Chancellorsville where "Stonewall" Jackson was fatally wounded.

The next major battle to be described is the famous battle at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. A computer rendered map shows the movements of both Union and Confederate forces from Fredericksburg, Virginia northward to the battlefield of Gettysburg. The battle took place on July 1-3 and was described by a Union soldier as "a perfect hell on earth" -- a fact attested to by the photos, sketches, and paintings surrounding the narrative. One such photo is of John Burns, who became famous as "the only civilian known to have fought at Gettysburg." He was a "72-year-old veteran of the War of 1812" who survived the Battle of Gettysburg and became a national hero. Small vignettes like this one are what make Eyewitness to the Civil War such a valuable book for genealogists and historians alike.

A section in the chapter focuses on the "War on the Home Front" and looks at the chaos caused in New York City due to the conscription of soldiers for the Union Army. There were problems since the wealthy could purchase a substitute for $300, and many felt poor immigrants, especially the Irish, were being forced into a war to "win freedom for blacks, who could then compete with them economically" by taking their jobs for a lower wage. Such feelings boiled over into a riot in July 1863. Poor blacks were the principal victims and suffered stonings, beatings, and lynchings. The police could not contain the violence and eventually Federal troops were brought in to quell the riots. 400 were dead or injured before the rioting stopped.

Southerners also had problems drafting soldiers and eventually had to change eligibility ages from 18- 35 to 17-50 and do away with substitutions and exemptions. Many Confederate soldiers were also deserting to merely support their families. Others were tired of the war and turned to pillaging and looting, though nothing compared to the New York City riots. Southern women showed their displeasure with the Confederate government by participating in bread riots. Hyslop points out that "by 1863, prices in the South had increased eightfold since the beginning of the war" and women were tired of it. As a result they would do a smash-and-grab at bakeries in the large cities.

But the largest group of resisters was the emancipated slaves who began to leave their masters. They began new lives of freedom as independent workers, started businesses, enlisted in the Union army, or went to school. A photo essay of "The Glory Regiment" illustrates the impact 200,000 African American soldiers had in the Union cause. Their story inspired the 1989 film Glory based on "the failed attack on Fort Wagner, South Carolina."

The dissent at this time also spurred a general lawlessness that led to gruesome attacks on Lawrence, Kansas by William Quantrell and his gang; Jesse James, Bloody Bill Anderson, and Cole and Jim Younger. Such bushwhacking was a symptom of the bloody conflict between North and South and continued even after the War's end.

The battle of Chickamauga, September 19-20, was "one of the bloodiest battles of the war." Photos, engravings, and paintings of soldiers -- along with eyewitness accounts -- round out the horrific narrative. Especially interesting is a sidebar about little Johnny Clem who joined the 22nd Michigan infantry band as a drummer. He "became the Union's darling when the press touted his exploits at Chickamauga." Johnny supposedly shot a Confederate soldier in self defense and was made a sergeant, given a silver medal, and "remained in the army for half a century" retiring as a major general at age 65.

The narrative of the Battle of Chattanooga is fleshed out by a hand-drawn map by Robert Knox Sneden, a painting, a sketch, and two photos. One photo is of a young soldier, battle hero Arthur MacArthur, Jr., father of famous General Douglas MacArthur--perfectly illustrating why this book is useful for family history research.

A photo essay, "The Cavalryman's Flair," ends the chapter with full-body shot photos of two cavalrymen: the dandy Union soldier George Armstrong Custer and Confederate John Singleton Mosby. The Cavalryman, according to Hyslop, "considered himself the heir to a knightly tradition-- dashing, gallant, and fearless." They were especially efficient soldiers because they became a hybrid of two European soldier models: "the classical light cavalry and the heavily armed dragoon" that could both scout and fight. Such efficiency is proven by photos of soldiers and their horses, along with photos of flags, hats, gauntlets, saddles, spurs and weapons (revolvers, rifles, and sabers).

Chapter 4 "1864-Rebels Under Siege" focuses on the battles and careers of Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant, specifically their campaign of the Wilderness in Virginia. The chapter includes photos of both generals, photos of their soldiers, officers, and battle sites, along with sketches and hand-drawn maps. Also photos of handmade fortifications or dugouts known as Fort Sedgewick and a pontoon bridge spanning 2,100 feet of the James River show the ingenuity of the Union Army and the technological innovation that resulted from the War.

The next portion of the chapter focuses on General William Sherman's campaign into Georgia, all documented with photos. He left troops along the way to protect railroad supply lines from Confederate soldiers. Maps and eyewitness accounts show the horrifying human cost for the Union's campaign in Georgia. One poignant account by Wallace P. Reed details how a day of "artillery fire" killed people indiscriminately as they ate breakfast, walked to work, or did their ironing. And yet "from a military standpoint these were no results worthy of mention."

The last section of the chapter details how the war was affecting President Lincoln and the politics in Washington. A political cartoon indicates visually Lincoln's supposed doubts about re-election. But the Union victory at Atlanta raised Lincoln's and the Union's hopes for a victory. However, in the midst of this positive note for the Union, a photo essay shows the terrible price prisoners of war paid, especially in the confederate camp of Andersonville. It was so unhealthy and inhumane that 13,000 of 33,000 Union prisoners died there from disease and malnutrition. Conditions were so bad that the camp commander, Captain Henry Wirz, "became the war's only figure executed for war crimes." But that essay and the single photo are nothing compared to the photo essay, "The Medical Middle Ages," that details battlefield surgery and hospital care. A photo of a surgeon's tool kit, full of saws and hammers, a photo of an amputation in progress, recovering and mutilated amputees, and a photo of sawed-off feet show clearly that "the power to heal was nowhere close to the power to maim." There was minimal understanding of sanitation, nutrition, germs or infection at this time. Surprisingly, in spite of the butchery of amputation, "only 14 percent of Federal soldiers died from their wounds, and 18 percent of Confederates...disease killed twice as many combatants." Hyslop points out that the war's "three main killers were diarrhea and dysentery, typhoid, and pneumonia, with malaria fourth." Fortunately advances in nursing were made thanks to women like Clara Barton, Dorothea Dix, Kate Cumming, Sally Tomkins, and Louisa May Alcott. These volunteers were soon preferred nurses by military doctors and their work "paved the way for nursing to become a legitimate profession for women after the war." The photos of these women and the hospitals they ran show that the war was being fought by women as well as men.

Chapter 5 "1865-The Final Act" rehearses the waning days and final battles of the Union and Confederate troops. The capture of Fort Fisher in North Carolina by Union troops effectively won the war since the Confederacy was cut off from their last supply point. Photos of the battle, along with those of the decimated Fort Sumter and burnt out Richmond, Virginia show the devastating cost of war. A poignant painting of General Lee's signing of the articles of surrender delivered by Grant and his aides on April 9 rounds out the narrative of the war's conclusion, as does a pencil sketch of President Jefferson Davis in prison.

The chapter ends with a content-rich photo essay, "The Assassination of Lincoln." Photos of himself, his hat, engravings of the assassination at the theater, a wanted poster, photos of the funeral procession, along with photos of the conspirators and their hangings bring this horrendous event to life for readers. It also proves again why this book is especially appropriate for a varied reading audience.

The Epilogue, "The Nation Reunited," examines how the whole nation was in chaos and had to put itself back together. The South was put under military rule and Vice President Andrew Johnson, Lincoln's successor, had to battle Congress continually as the government began reconstruction. The Congress countermanded many of his legislative acts with their own that protected newly-won liberties for all citizens. They set up the Freedmen's Bureau, which helped blacks and whites alike. Eventually Johnson's pro-states' rights and anti-freed slaves attitude led to his impeachment by Congress in February 1868. He escaped conviction by one vote.

Ulysses S. Grant easily won the presidential campaign that year and under his guidance African Americans in the South were slowly able to vote and improve their lives. Unfortunately, the Klu Klux Klan grew also and kept assaulting and dragging down the newly-freed citizens. The photos of the KKK show just how intimidating they could be. And yet there was an optimism after the war that led to westward expansion, especially by African Americans. Unfortunately, the reconstruction promoted by Grant ended when Rutherford B. Hayes became president in 1877. A photo essay at the end of the chapter tells what happened to several of the major players after the war, including Mary Lincoln.

The fabulous Appendices add to this book's value. "Casualties of War" gives a map and lists of the numbers of killed, wounded, and missing soldiers for both armies. For the entire war it was 364,000 Union soldiers and for the Confederacy it was 260,000, or 10% of the white male population. "Selected Milestones" gives a brief factual overview of the war; a "Vocabulary of War" explains key terms; "Additional Reading" lists over 100 hundred secondary texts on the Civil War; and a detailed index finishes the text.

While I find this book to be a good value for its price and also a helpful source for family historians, I must warn readers that it appears to favor the Union cause and story. For Southerners and researchers in Southern genealogy, keeping this bias in mind may be helpful. Also, while much of the written text is available for perusal on Google Books, only the photos on the dust jacket are visible. If you want to see photos from the book itself, you will need to find it at your local library or bookstore. Also of interest, there is a link from the Google Books page to Civil War videos on the History.com website.

Article written by Larisa S. Asaeli

Copyright : 2011 Fficiency Software, Inc. All rights reserved.
No reproduction of this article may be used without the express written permission of the author.

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Issue: Mar 31, 2010

Book review of Eyewitness to the Civil War: The Complete History from Secession to Reconstruction, by Stephen G. Hyslop, Ed. by Neil Kagan.
Review written by Larisa S. Asaeli
Hardcover: 416 pages; Online Price: $26.40 on Amazon

If such a book had been available for my 8th grade US History class, I might have listened better to Mrs. Preston's lessons about the American Civil War. It is the personal aspects of history that have always fascinated me, which is perhaps why I love doing genealogical research. If you are like me, more interested in people than battles and troop movements, then Eyewitness to the Civil War is the perfect book to complete your personal family history library. Published by the National Geographic Society, this book details the critical years leading up to, including, and after the American Civil War, with the major emphasis on the years 1861-1865. Stunning visually and content rich, this coffee-table book is not one that will sit gathering dust.

Eyewitness to the Civil War, while it details the major battles of the war, it is really about the people who were in and influenced by the war. Their letters, diaries, photos, memoirs, newspaper articles, maps, and souvenirs--the material artifacts that the war produced--are the focus of the book. In his introduction, Harris J. Andrews points out that such "surviving writings offer an intimate look into the first-hand experiences of soldiers and civilians seldom found in formal histories." Along with written records, the visuals, especially photographs, played an important role in documenting the war. Huge collections were amassed by photographers like Mathew Brady and later acquired by the U.S. government and now reside in the Library of Congress and the National Archives. Sketch artists and engravers were also crucial in telling the story of the war. Since the technology to print photographs was not yet available, it was up to the engravers to tell the visual story from the battle front. Also, soldiers and citizens kept detailed diaries and journals that often included illustrations that complement our knowledge of the war. And lastly, the map makers drew more than 24,000 maps for the Union Army alone. Relics and mementos such as uniforms, flags, cannons, and statues have also survived. All of these artifacts allow 21st-century readers to "experience the extraordinary events of the American Civil War" through a new and visually-rich text.

Each chapter includes five major parts: a narrative that gives the history of the period; a brief chronology that outlines important dates; eyewitness accounts from letters, diaries, and memoirs; maps hand drawn during the battles; and picture essays. All of these different parts allow readers to skim through the text quickly for a pictorial story, or to read in greater detail about such events as the battles, spies, and riots. Such a format will engage readers of different interest levels and ages.

The Prologue examines the tensions between what Stephen G. Hyslop describes as the "urban and industrialized North and the largely rural South with its plantation economy." The issues of states' rights vs. the federal government and the issue of slavery led to the split between the two halves of the nation. Also, contention over slavery in the new western states added fuel to the fire. Hyslop's discussion of important players such as Preston Brooks, Charles Sumner, John Brown, and Dred Scott show how tempers were rising high when Abraham Lincoln campaigned for President on the eve of the Civil War. Hyslop also gives a few details about women's contributions, specifically in the abolitionist cause and important works such as Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) and Harriet Jacobs' memoir Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861). The chapter ends with a stunning graphic photo essay on slavery that includes photos of slaves, whips, metal collars, and reward posters. All these images illustrate the degradation suffered by more than four million slaves when the war began in 1861.

Chapter 1 "1861: First Blood" details the War's beginning with Union forces taking over Fort Sumter in South Carolina. By February, seven states had seceded (South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas) and the Confederate States had chosen a president, Jefferson Davis. All this happened even before Abraham Lincoln had been sworn in as president in March. The attack on Fort Sumter came in April when Unionists refused to surrender. These events are brought to life with visuals and eyewitness accounts. Mary Boykin Miller Chestnut's firsthand account of the attack on Fort Sumter adds richness to the narrative but also proves the value of personal records when writing about historical events. A map by Robert Knox Sneden and photos of Fort Sumter round out the narrative, as does a stunning color-photo essay of ambrotypes and tintypes of Union and Confederate soldiers.

The chapter continues with details about more Southern states seceding (Arkansas, Tennessee, North Carolina, and Virginia) and state militias called up in the North. The early battles at Bull Run and Manassas are given visual heft with a moving personal letter written by Major Sullivan Ballou to his wife, Sarah, before his death. He tells her--"when my last breath escapes me on the battle field, it will whisper your name"--illustrating the terrible human cost of the war.

The chapter ends with a photo essay of soldiers' outfits for both North and South, which included: uniforms, gear, hats, shoes, buttons, shirts, socks, jackets, coats, armaments, bibles, wallets, blankets, bullets, and sewing kits. All these images are shown in full color and rich detail.

Chapter 2 "1862: Total War" shows the visually grim realities of war, the death and destruction wrecked on both sides. Hyslop says that in April "far more Americans were killed or wounded in two days of fighting at Shiloh [Tennessee] than had fallen in battle during the entire Revolutionary War." The horrors of these deaths were brought home to citizens by the photographs taken on the battlefield, something new for 19th-century Americans. The total dead was almost 3,600 and the wounded were over 16,000, making it "the bloodiest battle yet fought on American soil."

Along with photos, readers can see detailed maps, engravings, and paintings of the war in all its phases; on land, on sea, in open fields, and in the military forts. This chapter also includes a vignette of blockaders, focusing on Raphael Semmes, who attacked US merchants and navy ships for the Confederacy. Aided by the British, he eventually captured ships and cargo worth more than $6 million. Characters like Semmes, and the stories of women like Union Nurse Clara Barton, along with photos and other material artifacts, make this book a fascinating resource for family historians.

The Emancipation Proclamation was signed in 1862 and enacted into law on New Year's Day 1863. And yet before his election, President Lincoln was not an abolitionist. But once he was elected, he became more sympathetic to the plight of slaves and eventually became the "Great Emancipator" that we remember him as today. Hyslop calls 1862 the "year of trials" for Lincoln. Indeed, he was haunted his entire presidency by death threats and a feeling of foreboding about his own death, all explored in a detailed photo essay at the end of chapter 5.

The battle of Fredericksburg in December claimed the lives of nearly 2,000 soldiers, with many more wounded (detailed figures of killed, wounded, and missing are included for all battles in the book's appendix).

Chapter 3 "1863-Victory or Death" shows how the year began with "a lull between storms" since the two armies were tired, diseased, malnourished, and suffering from exposure. But by the year's end, battles such as Vicksburg, Mississippi "tipped the scales" in favor of the Union. The accounts of two women, Alice Shirley and Lucy McCrae, show the terrible cost of war for civilians and give added intensity to the battle's narrative.

At the end of January 1863 over 25,000 Union troops had deserted due to the terrible living conditions. When President Lincoln replaced General Burnside with Joseph Hooker the camps were cleaned up, living conditions were improved, rations increased, and security was enforced. As a result morale increased and soldiers were ready for another year of battle. All this information is supported with photos of the camp, the soldiers, and Hooker himself. Another striking photo in this section is of the three Chitwood brothers from Georgia, their arms linked and each brandishing a pistol and Bowie knife. One brother died and the other two were captured. Such a photo reminds us that the war was about people and families, just as much as it was a war of ideals.

The eyewitness account of Mary Anna Morrison Jackson of her husband's death--Lieutenant General "Stonewall" Thomas J. Jackson--also shows the terrible human suffering that occurred during the war. Her moving account is full of personal pathos about the bare facts of a soldier's death after pneumonia and the amputation of his left arm. Her husband's last words, "Let us cross over the river and rest under the shade of the trees" show the humanity and religious devotion of one of the war's most fearsome soldiers. Hand-drawn maps, paintings, and photos show the details of the Battle of Chancellorsville where "Stonewall" Jackson was fatally wounded.

The next major battle to be described is the famous battle at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. A computer rendered map shows the movements of both Union and Confederate forces from Fredericksburg, Virginia northward to the battlefield of Gettysburg. The battle took place on July 1-3 and was described by a Union soldier as "a perfect hell on earth" -- a fact attested to by the photos, sketches, and paintings surrounding the narrative. One such photo is of John Burns, who became famous as "the only civilian known to have fought at Gettysburg." He was a "72-year-old veteran of the War of 1812" who survived the Battle of Gettysburg and became a national hero. Small vignettes like this one are what make Eyewitness to the Civil War such a valuable book for genealogists and historians alike.

A section in the chapter focuses on the "War on the Home Front" and looks at the chaos caused in New York City due to the conscription of soldiers for the Union Army. There were problems since the wealthy could purchase a substitute for $300, and many felt poor immigrants, especially the Irish, were being forced into a war to "win freedom for blacks, who could then compete with them economically" by taking their jobs for a lower wage. Such feelings boiled over into a riot in July 1863. Poor blacks were the principal victims and suffered stonings, beatings, and lynchings. The police could not contain the violence and eventually Federal troops were brought in to quell the riots. 400 were dead or injured before the rioting stopped.

Southerners also had problems drafting soldiers and eventually had to change eligibility ages from 18- 35 to 17-50 and do away with substitutions and exemptions. Many Confederate soldiers were also deserting to merely support their families. Others were tired of the war and turned to pillaging and looting, though nothing compared to the New York City riots. Southern women showed their displeasure with the Confederate government by participating in bread riots. Hyslop points out that "by 1863, prices in the South had increased eightfold since the beginning of the war" and women were tired of it. As a result they would do a smash-and-grab at bakeries in the large cities.

But the largest group of resisters was the emancipated slaves who began to leave their masters. They began new lives of freedom as independent workers, started businesses, enlisted in the Union army, or went to school. A photo essay of "The Glory Regiment" illustrates the impact 200,000 African American soldiers had in the Union cause. Their story inspired the 1989 film Glory based on "the failed attack on Fort Wagner, South Carolina."

The dissent at this time also spurred a general lawlessness that led to gruesome attacks on Lawrence, Kansas by William Quantrell and his gang; Jesse James, Bloody Bill Anderson, and Cole and Jim Younger. Such bushwhacking was a symptom of the bloody conflict between North and South and continued even after the War's end.

The battle of Chickamauga, September 19-20, was "one of the bloodiest battles of the war." Photos, engravings, and paintings of soldiers -- along with eyewitness accounts -- round out the horrific narrative. Especially interesting is a sidebar about little Johnny Clem who joined the 22nd Michigan infantry band as a drummer. He "became the Union's darling when the press touted his exploits at Chickamauga." Johnny supposedly shot a Confederate soldier in self defense and was made a sergeant, given a silver medal, and "remained in the army for half a century" retiring as a major general at age 65.

The narrative of the Battle of Chattanooga is fleshed out by a hand-drawn map by Robert Knox Sneden, a painting, a sketch, and two photos. One photo is of a young soldier, battle hero Arthur MacArthur, Jr., father of famous General Douglas MacArthur--perfectly illustrating why this book is useful for family history research.

A photo essay, "The Cavalryman's Flair," ends the chapter with full-body shot photos of two cavalrymen: the dandy Union soldier George Armstrong Custer and Confederate John Singleton Mosby. The Cavalryman, according to Hyslop, "considered himself the heir to a knightly tradition-- dashing, gallant, and fearless." They were especially efficient soldiers because they became a hybrid of two European soldier models: "the classical light cavalry and the heavily armed dragoon" that could both scout and fight. Such efficiency is proven by photos of soldiers and their horses, along with photos of flags, hats, gauntlets, saddles, spurs and weapons (revolvers, rifles, and sabers).

Chapter 4 "1864-Rebels Under Siege" focuses on the battles and careers of Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant, specifically their campaign of the Wilderness in Virginia. The chapter includes photos of both generals, photos of their soldiers, officers, and battle sites, along with sketches and hand-drawn maps. Also photos of handmade fortifications or dugouts known as Fort Sedgewick and a pontoon bridge spanning 2,100 feet of the James River show the ingenuity of the Union Army and the technological innovation that resulted from the War.

The next portion of the chapter focuses on General William Sherman's campaign into Georgia, all documented with photos. He left troops along the way to protect railroad supply lines from Confederate soldiers. Maps and eyewitness accounts show the horrifying human cost for the Union's campaign in Georgia. One poignant account by Wallace P. Reed details how a day of "artillery fire" killed people indiscriminately as they ate breakfast, walked to work, or did their ironing. And yet "from a military standpoint these were no results worthy of mention."

The last section of the chapter details how the war was affecting President Lincoln and the politics in Washington. A political cartoon indicates visually Lincoln's supposed doubts about re-election. But the Union victory at Atlanta raised Lincoln's and the Union's hopes for a victory. However, in the midst of this positive note for the Union, a photo essay shows the terrible price prisoners of war paid, especially in the confederate camp of Andersonville. It was so unhealthy and inhumane that 13,000 of 33,000 Union prisoners died there from disease and malnutrition. Conditions were so bad that the camp commander, Captain Henry Wirz, "became the war's only figure executed for war crimes." But that essay and the single photo are nothing compared to the photo essay, "The Medical Middle Ages," that details battlefield surgery and hospital care. A photo of a surgeon's tool kit, full of saws and hammers, a photo of an amputation in progress, recovering and mutilated amputees, and a photo of sawed-off feet show clearly that "the power to heal was nowhere close to the power to maim." There was minimal understanding of sanitation, nutrition, germs or infection at this time. Surprisingly, in spite of the butchery of amputation, "only 14 percent of Federal soldiers died from their wounds, and 18 percent of Confederates...disease killed twice as many combatants." Hyslop points out that the war's "three main killers were diarrhea and dysentery, typhoid, and pneumonia, with malaria fourth." Fortunately advances in nursing were made thanks to women like Clara Barton, Dorothea Dix, Kate Cumming, Sally Tomkins, and Louisa May Alcott. These volunteers were soon preferred nurses by military doctors and their work "paved the way for nursing to become a legitimate profession for women after the war." The photos of these women and the hospitals they ran show that the war was being fought by women as well as men.

Chapter 5 "1865-The Final Act" rehearses the waning days and final battles of the Union and Confederate troops. The capture of Fort Fisher in North Carolina by Union troops effectively won the war since the Confederacy was cut off from their last supply point. Photos of the battle, along with those of the decimated Fort Sumter and burnt out Richmond, Virginia show the devastating cost of war. A poignant painting of General Lee's signing of the articles of surrender delivered by Grant and his aides on April 9 rounds out the narrative of the war's conclusion, as does a pencil sketch of President Jefferson Davis in prison.

The chapter ends with a content-rich photo essay, "The Assassination of Lincoln." Photos of himself, his hat, engravings of the assassination at the theater, a wanted poster, photos of the funeral procession, along with photos of the conspirators and their hangings bring this horrendous event to life for readers. It also proves again why this book is especially appropriate for a varied reading audience.

The Epilogue, "The Nation Reunited," examines how the whole nation was in chaos and had to put itself back together. The South was put under military rule and Vice President Andrew Johnson, Lincoln's successor, had to battle Congress continually as the government began reconstruction. The Congress countermanded many of his legislative acts with their own that protected newly-won liberties for all citizens. They set up the Freedmen's Bureau, which helped blacks and whites alike. Eventually Johnson's pro-states' rights and anti-freed slaves attitude led to his impeachment by Congress in February 1868. He escaped conviction by one vote.

Ulysses S. Grant easily won the presidential campaign that year and under his guidance African Americans in the South were slowly able to vote and improve their lives. Unfortunately, the Klu Klux Klan grew also and kept assaulting and dragging down the newly-freed citizens. The photos of the KKK show just how intimidating they could be. And yet there was an optimism after the war that led to westward expansion, especially by African Americans. Unfortunately, the reconstruction promoted by Grant ended when Rutherford B. Hayes became president in 1877. A photo essay at the end of the chapter tells what happened to several of the major players after the war, including Mary Lincoln.

The fabulous Appendices add to this book's value. "Casualties of War" gives a map and lists of the numbers of killed, wounded, and missing soldiers for both armies. For the entire war it was 364,000 Union soldiers and for the Confederacy it was 260,000, or 10% of the white male population. "Selected Milestones" gives a brief factual overview of the war; a "Vocabulary of War" explains key terms; "Additional Reading" lists over 100 hundred secondary texts on the Civil War; and a detailed index finishes the text.

While I find this book to be a good value for its price and also a helpful source for family historians, I must warn readers that it appears to favor the Union cause and story. For Southerners and researchers in Southern genealogy, keeping this bias in mind may be helpful. Also, while much of the written text is available for perusal on Google Books, only the photos on the dust jacket are visible. If you want to see photos from the book itself, you will need to find it at your local library or bookstore. Also of interest, there is a link from the Google Books page to Civil War videos on the History.com website.

Article written by Larisa S. Asaeli

Copyright : 2011 Fficiency Software, Inc. All rights reserved.
No reproduction of this article may be used without the express written permission of the author.

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