The MyTrees.com Genealogy and Family History Center Explore the MyTrees.com Forum for your ancestors!

 

Genealogy & Family History
The MyTrees.com Genealogy and Family History Center Explore the MyTrees.com Forum for your ancestors!
Genealogy & Family History
Newsletters
Our Sponsors

Select Newsletter by Issue or Topic:

Genealogy HowTo
Issue: Apr 1, 2009

Migration Helps Solve Genealogy Problems

by Karen Clifford, AG®, FUGA

Today researchers are confronted constantly with decisions as to which family, parent, or spouse is the correct person to add to the known family tree to extend it another generation. Sometimes the possible contending individual lives a long distance away and it doesn't seem likely they belong to your family.

Yet it is known that most American family trees have one, and sometimes several, branches that start out in one place, but end up in another. In fact, prior to faster transportation, these migrating family branches usually interrupted their journey to a specific destination. Sometimes the delay was for a year or two due to health, economic, or external reasons.

At these "way stations", the information needed to prove the relationship you seek just may have been recorded. It might be recorded in a local obituary, in a church record, or as a journal entry. But where did they stop? The answer may be discovered through the new sourcing features added to genealogy computer programs in the past decade. While sourcing was intended to preserve sufficient evidence to prove such relationships between two generations, it can also track migration patterns.

Genealogists discovered that a closer look at a family's migration patterns could lead to formerly unknown localities where primary birth, marriage, and death records were stored. It wasn't long before new technology arose to assist migration research. It was found that a visual representation of the movement of an individual could assist in recognizing these formerly unsearched sources.

A visual representation also helped explain to others why research should be conducted in a previously, unconsidered area. Genealogy computer database programmers and web site designers saw the value and added eye appeal to plotting individual life movements within their products.

For example users can now automatically pinpoint and plot important locations in ancestors' lives using Microsoft® Virtual Earth™ from within Legacy 7.0. Using the events entered into the program, it is possible to see 3-D, satellite and bird's eye images of where your ancestors lived, and thus track their migration.

Family Tree Maker 2009 has a "place workplace" which pin points localities mentioned in the place fields of a family tree. The program will track and print your ancestors' migration paths on interactive maps using the places named.

And how does this help? By plotting the family movements in chronological order with the exact location listed by each event, researchers can be led to more repositories, and more records that cover:

  • Methods of travel during various times in different localities. The earliest form of migration was by water. Several transportation systems recorded passengers or those who traveled together on passenger ships, on the new canals, in wagon trains, and on the new railroads for example.
  • Barriers or detours to migration caused by enemies, land masses, weather, epidemics, etc., were found to be recorded in local, regional, or county histories and newspapers which lead to other sources.
  • Terms for migration tendencies and how they link to genealogy methodologies are found in local society periodicals. For example when there was an economic or social cause for a migration an article would cover this situation. When migrants from one area stream into the same areas in the new locality, it was called clustering.
  • When families, relatives, friends, and neighbors followed each other from one place of origin to another, it was called a chain migration.
  • Application of migration principles used along with research analysis can solve personal family history mysteries. It is a migration principle (taught by Ernest George Ravenstein in 1885) that more young adults migrate than those who have raised their families (unless they go to be with their children).
  • Ravenstein also taught that females tend to migrate within their county of birth (but they have a different last name so you dont recognize them). Males tend to leave their county of birth.
  • Another migration principle in the United States is that most people moved from the east to the west. When you find someone moving from the west to the east in these earlier time periods it causes you to wonder why. Was there a personal reason for returning? Did the father die, so the son and his family returned to help the mother? How can you know? You would check the probate records of the state and county where the family returned, or you learn more about the siblings.

How can one learn about, record, and capitalize on migration patterns?
Go to the experts! Many people have shared their experiences with migration in various excellent resources.

  • Genealogy How-to-Books and presentations by George Schweitzer, Helen Leary, Wade Hone, etc. Go to www.familysearch.org and click on the library tab, then on the library catalog tab, then on the place search option. Type in a state. Once the state appears, scroll down to the option "Genealogy, How to." Study the resources for the state of interest.
  • Migration trails in an entire region are found in historical atlases. Instead of using the "Place Search Option," in the catalog above, use the "Key Word" search and type in "historical atlas."
  • Search www.loc.gov or go to Google and type "Library of Congress." Go to maps, or type in the search screen "Migration Trails Map."
  • Go to Google and enter, "Historical Migration Trails."
  • Go to http://wiki.familysearch.org and enter a state. Ask for migration trails, or historical maps, or just migration. The Handybook for Genealogists, is an excellent publication that contains good maps for each state and county in the United States, and an overview of the entire U.S. with named migration trails maps. It is published by Everton Publishing Company.
  • Test out some of the above ideas by finding possible family links when plotting the localities for one or two generations that might link to your own. Find these possible links by searching compiled genealogies either as published family histories, or found on-line at:
    www.mytrees.com
    Ancestry.com
    www.familysearch.org
    RootsWeb.com
    www.usgenweb.org

To capitalize on this information, one must study and apply what is learned to a specific case. In our next newsletter, we will use a case study to show how Family Migration Studies helped to extend an ancestral line further back in time. In the meantime, record all the known localities of your own brick wall ancestral line for one or two generations prior to the brick wall.

Article written by Karen Clifford from Genealogy Research Associates. Sponsored by MyTrees.com.

Copyright ©: 2011 Karen Clifford. All rights reserved.

No reproduction of this article may be used without the express written permission of the author.

Newsletters

Select Newsletter by Issue or Topic:

Genealogy HowTo
Issue: Apr 1, 2009

Migration Helps Solve Genealogy Problems

by Karen Clifford, AG®, FUGA

Today researchers are confronted constantly with decisions as to which family, parent, or spouse is the correct person to add to the known family tree to extend it another generation. Sometimes the possible contending individual lives a long distance away and it doesn't seem likely they belong to your family.

Yet it is known that most American family trees have one, and sometimes several, branches that start out in one place, but end up in another. In fact, prior to faster transportation, these migrating family branches usually interrupted their journey to a specific destination. Sometimes the delay was for a year or two due to health, economic, or external reasons.

At these "way stations", the information needed to prove the relationship you seek just may have been recorded. It might be recorded in a local obituary, in a church record, or as a journal entry. But where did they stop? The answer may be discovered through the new sourcing features added to genealogy computer programs in the past decade. While sourcing was intended to preserve sufficient evidence to prove such relationships between two generations, it can also track migration patterns.

Genealogists discovered that a closer look at a family's migration patterns could lead to formerly unknown localities where primary birth, marriage, and death records were stored. It wasn't long before new technology arose to assist migration research. It was found that a visual representation of the movement of an individual could assist in recognizing these formerly unsearched sources.

A visual representation also helped explain to others why research should be conducted in a previously, unconsidered area. Genealogy computer database programmers and web site designers saw the value and added eye appeal to plotting individual life movements within their products.

For example users can now automatically pinpoint and plot important locations in ancestors' lives using Microsoft® Virtual Earth™ from within Legacy 7.0. Using the events entered into the program, it is possible to see 3-D, satellite and bird's eye images of where your ancestors lived, and thus track their migration.

Family Tree Maker 2009 has a "place workplace" which pin points localities mentioned in the place fields of a family tree. The program will track and print your ancestors' migration paths on interactive maps using the places named.

And how does this help? By plotting the family movements in chronological order with the exact location listed by each event, researchers can be led to more repositories, and more records that cover:

  • Methods of travel during various times in different localities. The earliest form of migration was by water. Several transportation systems recorded passengers or those who traveled together on passenger ships, on the new canals, in wagon trains, and on the new railroads for example.
  • Barriers or detours to migration caused by enemies, land masses, weather, epidemics, etc., were found to be recorded in local, regional, or county histories and newspapers which lead to other sources.
  • Terms for migration tendencies and how they link to genealogy methodologies are found in local society periodicals. For example when there was an economic or social cause for a migration an article would cover this situation. When migrants from one area stream into the same areas in the new locality, it was called clustering.
  • When families, relatives, friends, and neighbors followed each other from one place of origin to another, it was called a chain migration.
  • Application of migration principles used along with research analysis can solve personal family history mysteries. It is a migration principle (taught by Ernest George Ravenstein in 1885) that more young adults migrate than those who have raised their families (unless they go to be with their children).
  • Ravenstein also taught that females tend to migrate within their county of birth (but they have a different last name so you dont recognize them). Males tend to leave their county of birth.
  • Another migration principle in the United States is that most people moved from the east to the west. When you find someone moving from the west to the east in these earlier time periods it causes you to wonder why. Was there a personal reason for returning? Did the father die, so the son and his family returned to help the mother? How can you know? You would check the probate records of the state and county where the family returned, or you learn more about the siblings.

How can one learn about, record, and capitalize on migration patterns?
Go to the experts! Many people have shared their experiences with migration in various excellent resources.

  • Genealogy How-to-Books and presentations by George Schweitzer, Helen Leary, Wade Hone, etc. Go to www.familysearch.org and click on the library tab, then on the library catalog tab, then on the place search option. Type in a state. Once the state appears, scroll down to the option "Genealogy, How to." Study the resources for the state of interest.
  • Migration trails in an entire region are found in historical atlases. Instead of using the "Place Search Option," in the catalog above, use the "Key Word" search and type in "historical atlas."
  • Search www.loc.gov or go to Google and type "Library of Congress." Go to maps, or type in the search screen "Migration Trails Map."
  • Go to Google and enter, "Historical Migration Trails."
  • Go to http://wiki.familysearch.org and enter a state. Ask for migration trails, or historical maps, or just migration. The Handybook for Genealogists, is an excellent publication that contains good maps for each state and county in the United States, and an overview of the entire U.S. with named migration trails maps. It is published by Everton Publishing Company.
  • Test out some of the above ideas by finding possible family links when plotting the localities for one or two generations that might link to your own. Find these possible links by searching compiled genealogies either as published family histories, or found on-line at:
    www.mytrees.com
    Ancestry.com
    www.familysearch.org
    RootsWeb.com
    www.usgenweb.org

To capitalize on this information, one must study and apply what is learned to a specific case. In our next newsletter, we will use a case study to show how Family Migration Studies helped to extend an ancestral line further back in time. In the meantime, record all the known localities of your own brick wall ancestral line for one or two generations prior to the brick wall.

Article written by Karen Clifford from Genealogy Research Associates. Sponsored by MyTrees.com.

Copyright ©: 2011 Karen Clifford. All rights reserved.

No reproduction of this article may be used without the express written permission of the author.

Newsletters

Select Newsletter by Issue or Topic:

Genealogy HowTo
Issue: Apr 1, 2009

Migration Helps Solve Genealogy Problems

by Karen Clifford, AG®, FUGA

Today researchers are confronted constantly with decisions as to which family, parent, or spouse is the correct person to add to the known family tree to extend it another generation. Sometimes the possible contending individual lives a long distance away and it doesn't seem likely they belong to your family.

Yet it is known that most American family trees have one, and sometimes several, branches that start out in one place, but end up in another. In fact, prior to faster transportation, these migrating family branches usually interrupted their journey to a specific destination. Sometimes the delay was for a year or two due to health, economic, or external reasons.

At these "way stations", the information needed to prove the relationship you seek just may have been recorded. It might be recorded in a local obituary, in a church record, or as a journal entry. But where did they stop? The answer may be discovered through the new sourcing features added to genealogy computer programs in the past decade. While sourcing was intended to preserve sufficient evidence to prove such relationships between two generations, it can also track migration patterns.

Genealogists discovered that a closer look at a family's migration patterns could lead to formerly unknown localities where primary birth, marriage, and death records were stored. It wasn't long before new technology arose to assist migration research. It was found that a visual representation of the movement of an individual could assist in recognizing these formerly unsearched sources.

A visual representation also helped explain to others why research should be conducted in a previously, unconsidered area. Genealogy computer database programmers and web site designers saw the value and added eye appeal to plotting individual life movements within their products.

For example users can now automatically pinpoint and plot important locations in ancestors' lives using Microsoft® Virtual Earth™ from within Legacy 7.0. Using the events entered into the program, it is possible to see 3-D, satellite and bird's eye images of where your ancestors lived, and thus track their migration.

Family Tree Maker 2009 has a "place workplace" which pin points localities mentioned in the place fields of a family tree. The program will track and print your ancestors' migration paths on interactive maps using the places named.

And how does this help? By plotting the family movements in chronological order with the exact location listed by each event, researchers can be led to more repositories, and more records that cover:

  • Methods of travel during various times in different localities. The earliest form of migration was by water. Several transportation systems recorded passengers or those who traveled together on passenger ships, on the new canals, in wagon trains, and on the new railroads for example.
  • Barriers or detours to migration caused by enemies, land masses, weather, epidemics, etc., were found to be recorded in local, regional, or county histories and newspapers which lead to other sources.
  • Terms for migration tendencies and how they link to genealogy methodologies are found in local society periodicals. For example when there was an economic or social cause for a migration an article would cover this situation. When migrants from one area stream into the same areas in the new locality, it was called clustering.
  • When families, relatives, friends, and neighbors followed each other from one place of origin to another, it was called a chain migration.
  • Application of migration principles used along with research analysis can solve personal family history mysteries. It is a migration principle (taught by Ernest George Ravenstein in 1885) that more young adults migrate than those who have raised their families (unless they go to be with their children).
  • Ravenstein also taught that females tend to migrate within their county of birth (but they have a different last name so you dont recognize them). Males tend to leave their county of birth.
  • Another migration principle in the United States is that most people moved from the east to the west. When you find someone moving from the west to the east in these earlier time periods it causes you to wonder why. Was there a personal reason for returning? Did the father die, so the son and his family returned to help the mother? How can you know? You would check the probate records of the state and county where the family returned, or you learn more about the siblings.

How can one learn about, record, and capitalize on migration patterns?
Go to the experts! Many people have shared their experiences with migration in various excellent resources.

  • Genealogy How-to-Books and presentations by George Schweitzer, Helen Leary, Wade Hone, etc. Go to www.familysearch.org and click on the library tab, then on the library catalog tab, then on the place search option. Type in a state. Once the state appears, scroll down to the option "Genealogy, How to." Study the resources for the state of interest.
  • Migration trails in an entire region are found in historical atlases. Instead of using the "Place Search Option," in the catalog above, use the "Key Word" search and type in "historical atlas."
  • Search www.loc.gov or go to Google and type "Library of Congress." Go to maps, or type in the search screen "Migration Trails Map."
  • Go to Google and enter, "Historical Migration Trails."
  • Go to http://wiki.familysearch.org and enter a state. Ask for migration trails, or historical maps, or just migration. The Handybook for Genealogists, is an excellent publication that contains good maps for each state and county in the United States, and an overview of the entire U.S. with named migration trails maps. It is published by Everton Publishing Company.
  • Test out some of the above ideas by finding possible family links when plotting the localities for one or two generations that might link to your own. Find these possible links by searching compiled genealogies either as published family histories, or found on-line at:
    www.mytrees.com
    Ancestry.com
    www.familysearch.org
    RootsWeb.com
    www.usgenweb.org

To capitalize on this information, one must study and apply what is learned to a specific case. In our next newsletter, we will use a case study to show how Family Migration Studies helped to extend an ancestral line further back in time. In the meantime, record all the known localities of your own brick wall ancestral line for one or two generations prior to the brick wall.

Article written by Karen Clifford from Genealogy Research Associates. Sponsored by MyTrees.com.

Copyright ©: 2011 Karen Clifford. All rights reserved.

No reproduction of this article may be used without the express written permission of the author.

Newsletter Signup | My Account | Names Added | Site Map | Our Company
 
Affiliate | Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Terms and Conditions
Copyright © 2017-2019 Fficiency Software, Inc. All rights reserved.