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Genealogy HowTo
Issue: Nov 5, 2004

The name is the same. The ages are about the same. They are in the same state. Are They the Same Person?
By Karen Clifford, AG, FUGA

John Hundley
- born about 1770/1774
- married 2 Mar 1795 in Charlotte County, Virginia, to Elizabeth Edge
- They had two daughters: Polly born about 1794 and Cynthia before 1797.
Polly married John Perkinson 11 Apr 1814. Cynthia married 1815 David Rutledge.
- Could his father be a John Hundley? Lots of men were named after their father.

John Hundley
- born about 1773/1774
- married before 1803 to Nancy Elizabeth Covington
- He had a son Harrison born 1803 in Henry County, Virginia; and George W. Hundley born 1805/1806 in Henry County, Virginia.
His father was George Hundley born about 1754 and died about 1781 in Pittsylvania, Virginia.

The question is whether these two John Hundleys are the same person? The name is the same. The ages may be the same. They are in the same state. Because the last daughter in the one family was born before 1797, and the first child in the second family was born in 1803, the children are not conflicting in their birth dates. It looks like it would work, but is it the right man?

The odds are against it! A quick check of the 1830 census index for Virginia indicated numerous John Hundleys throughout Virginia. John is an extremely common male name for the time period. Others with his same name are his same age. The name Elizabeth is also very common.

While www.MyTrees.com greatly speeds up the research comparison processes, if we searched using the name John Hundley as the most important criteria, we could find ourselves frustrated because there were so many John Hundelys of about the same age and in the same state. Even within a family in which a son was named for the father, the rough odds was only one in five that "your John" would be named for his father. The odds are typical in other Southern families where it was very likely for at least five sons or more to be born in a family. With so many Hundley/Hundly/Hunly as well as Honly, Unley, Henly spellings of the name, the odds are smaller that the name and time period alone would work to solve this research problem.

How do you solve such a problem? Focus next on the locality. Do you know where in Virginia "your" John was born? If not, where were any of his children or siblings born? Was that locality even in the same county as the John who married Nancy or Elizabeth? And even if it is the same county, can you narrow the locality down further to the specific community (such as a military district, riverway district, etc.) within the county. Even locating John in the same county does not give a reliable yes to, "Are these two Johns the same person?" Did you consider the evolvement of the county? What was its parent county? And then, odds are, you would have to do exhaustive research on John and Nancy/Elizabeth and each of their children to determine what happened to the John that other researchers have not yet been able to locate.

If you don't know where in Virginia "your" John was born, then it is premature to focus your search upon Virginia. The focus needs to be upon the neighborhood in which, you say, "your" John or his children spent their life; in other words, the focus needs to be upon him, Nancy/Elizabeth's family, and every known associate. (And particularly upon every neighbor and associate with a Virginia origin.) There are always links between a man and his prior place of residence -- usually human links. Those links have to be established before you can say that your John of his later residence is the same as John in Virginia.

An exhaustive search where he lived his life, looking for every record he created and every record his neighbors and associates created should yield a clue to when the "Virginia to the later place" move was made, who made it, and where in Virginia they came from.

Don't forget to mention the race or ethnicity of all of these families in your notes. Considering that you are dealing with a South migration in the Revolutionary War period, or just prior to the War of 1812, evidence regarding origin and parentage may be found in military records. These same records might also be the rationale for migration. The fact is, www.MyTrees.com can help you locate those individuals who have posted more valuable "real estate" in the form of "documented" information with their pedigrees. Likewise, you can make your pedigree more "valuable" by posting the sources you have used so people will know what you are missing.

Even if the submitter did not post his/her sources, don't forget to contact the submitter of the information. We recently did that. We asked the question: How do you know that this person was born on this date? Amazingly three people responded to three emails. One was a winner! After looking over our lists of sources and what they said, he noticed he had something we were missing. He stated that he had a copy of a letter written by the person's granddaughter who was twelve years old when her grandfather died. She gave the family stories about the generation that came to America within that grandfather's lifetime. She also gave exact birth dates for several of her siblings, and for those she didn't have the birth dates for, she knew their ages because she was 8, 6, 4, or 2 years younger than they were.

The reality is that without someone who has already done this fundamental work, it will take the level of work outlined above to prove "your" John's parentage. By finding someone who may have a record that exists only in that branch of the family today, you could confidently explore proving what was provided instead of starting from scratch. Visit www.MyTrees.com and see what a time saver to your research it can be!

Article written by Karen Clifford from Genealogy Research Associates. Sponsored MyTrees.com.

Copyright ©: 2011 Karen Clifford. All rights reserved.

No reproduction of this article may be used without the express written permission of the author.

About the Author Karen Clifford

Karen Clifford, AG, is Founder and President of Genealogy Research Associates, Inc., a leading provider of professional research, educational products, and innovative genealogical services. http://www.graonline.com She is an Accredited Genealogist in Midwestern States Research, she has specialized for years in Southern States and Scandinavian Research. Karen has worked as an instructor in the Associates Degree programs in Library Science-Genealogy and Computers at Hartnell College (Salinas, California) and Monterey Peninsula College (Monterey, California). She has authored several family histories and textbooks including Genealogy & Computers for the Complete Beginner; Genealogy & Computers for the Determined Researcher; Genealogy & Computers for the Advanced Researcher; and Becoming an Accredited Genealogist.

Karen has served as Vice-President of the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) and Vice-President of the Utah Genealogical Association (UGA) and is a frequent speaker at major conferences and institutes.. She is a member of the California State Genealogy Alliance, the Association of Professional Genealogists, the National Genealogical Society, and the New England Historic Genealogical Society and was the founding President of the Monterey County Genealogy Society. She has served as Director of UGA's Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy. She has received several awards for her volunteer work in the genealogy community including the FGS Award of Merit and the FGS Outstanding Delegate Award.

Newsletters

Select Newsletter by Issue or Topic:

Genealogy HowTo
Issue: Nov 5, 2004

The name is the same. The ages are about the same. They are in the same state. Are They the Same Person?
By Karen Clifford, AG, FUGA

John Hundley
- born about 1770/1774
- married 2 Mar 1795 in Charlotte County, Virginia, to Elizabeth Edge
- They had two daughters: Polly born about 1794 and Cynthia before 1797.
Polly married John Perkinson 11 Apr 1814. Cynthia married 1815 David Rutledge.
- Could his father be a John Hundley? Lots of men were named after their father.

John Hundley
- born about 1773/1774
- married before 1803 to Nancy Elizabeth Covington
- He had a son Harrison born 1803 in Henry County, Virginia; and George W. Hundley born 1805/1806 in Henry County, Virginia.
His father was George Hundley born about 1754 and died about 1781 in Pittsylvania, Virginia.

The question is whether these two John Hundleys are the same person? The name is the same. The ages may be the same. They are in the same state. Because the last daughter in the one family was born before 1797, and the first child in the second family was born in 1803, the children are not conflicting in their birth dates. It looks like it would work, but is it the right man?

The odds are against it! A quick check of the 1830 census index for Virginia indicated numerous John Hundleys throughout Virginia. John is an extremely common male name for the time period. Others with his same name are his same age. The name Elizabeth is also very common.

While www.MyTrees.com greatly speeds up the research comparison processes, if we searched using the name John Hundley as the most important criteria, we could find ourselves frustrated because there were so many John Hundelys of about the same age and in the same state. Even within a family in which a son was named for the father, the rough odds was only one in five that "your John" would be named for his father. The odds are typical in other Southern families where it was very likely for at least five sons or more to be born in a family. With so many Hundley/Hundly/Hunly as well as Honly, Unley, Henly spellings of the name, the odds are smaller that the name and time period alone would work to solve this research problem.

How do you solve such a problem? Focus next on the locality. Do you know where in Virginia "your" John was born? If not, where were any of his children or siblings born? Was that locality even in the same county as the John who married Nancy or Elizabeth? And even if it is the same county, can you narrow the locality down further to the specific community (such as a military district, riverway district, etc.) within the county. Even locating John in the same county does not give a reliable yes to, "Are these two Johns the same person?" Did you consider the evolvement of the county? What was its parent county? And then, odds are, you would have to do exhaustive research on John and Nancy/Elizabeth and each of their children to determine what happened to the John that other researchers have not yet been able to locate.

If you don't know where in Virginia "your" John was born, then it is premature to focus your search upon Virginia. The focus needs to be upon the neighborhood in which, you say, "your" John or his children spent their life; in other words, the focus needs to be upon him, Nancy/Elizabeth's family, and every known associate. (And particularly upon every neighbor and associate with a Virginia origin.) There are always links between a man and his prior place of residence -- usually human links. Those links have to be established before you can say that your John of his later residence is the same as John in Virginia.

An exhaustive search where he lived his life, looking for every record he created and every record his neighbors and associates created should yield a clue to when the "Virginia to the later place" move was made, who made it, and where in Virginia they came from.

Don't forget to mention the race or ethnicity of all of these families in your notes. Considering that you are dealing with a South migration in the Revolutionary War period, or just prior to the War of 1812, evidence regarding origin and parentage may be found in military records. These same records might also be the rationale for migration. The fact is, www.MyTrees.com can help you locate those individuals who have posted more valuable "real estate" in the form of "documented" information with their pedigrees. Likewise, you can make your pedigree more "valuable" by posting the sources you have used so people will know what you are missing.

Even if the submitter did not post his/her sources, don't forget to contact the submitter of the information. We recently did that. We asked the question: How do you know that this person was born on this date? Amazingly three people responded to three emails. One was a winner! After looking over our lists of sources and what they said, he noticed he had something we were missing. He stated that he had a copy of a letter written by the person's granddaughter who was twelve years old when her grandfather died. She gave the family stories about the generation that came to America within that grandfather's lifetime. She also gave exact birth dates for several of her siblings, and for those she didn't have the birth dates for, she knew their ages because she was 8, 6, 4, or 2 years younger than they were.

The reality is that without someone who has already done this fundamental work, it will take the level of work outlined above to prove "your" John's parentage. By finding someone who may have a record that exists only in that branch of the family today, you could confidently explore proving what was provided instead of starting from scratch. Visit www.MyTrees.com and see what a time saver to your research it can be!

Article written by Karen Clifford from Genealogy Research Associates. Sponsored MyTrees.com.

Copyright ©: 2011 Karen Clifford. All rights reserved.

No reproduction of this article may be used without the express written permission of the author.

About the Author Karen Clifford

Karen Clifford, AG, is Founder and President of Genealogy Research Associates, Inc., a leading provider of professional research, educational products, and innovative genealogical services. http://www.graonline.com She is an Accredited Genealogist in Midwestern States Research, she has specialized for years in Southern States and Scandinavian Research. Karen has worked as an instructor in the Associates Degree programs in Library Science-Genealogy and Computers at Hartnell College (Salinas, California) and Monterey Peninsula College (Monterey, California). She has authored several family histories and textbooks including Genealogy & Computers for the Complete Beginner; Genealogy & Computers for the Determined Researcher; Genealogy & Computers for the Advanced Researcher; and Becoming an Accredited Genealogist.

Karen has served as Vice-President of the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) and Vice-President of the Utah Genealogical Association (UGA) and is a frequent speaker at major conferences and institutes.. She is a member of the California State Genealogy Alliance, the Association of Professional Genealogists, the National Genealogical Society, and the New England Historic Genealogical Society and was the founding President of the Monterey County Genealogy Society. She has served as Director of UGA's Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy. She has received several awards for her volunteer work in the genealogy community including the FGS Award of Merit and the FGS Outstanding Delegate Award.

Newsletters

Select Newsletter by Issue or Topic:

Genealogy HowTo
Issue: Nov 5, 2004

The name is the same. The ages are about the same. They are in the same state. Are They the Same Person?
By Karen Clifford, AG, FUGA

John Hundley
- born about 1770/1774
- married 2 Mar 1795 in Charlotte County, Virginia, to Elizabeth Edge
- They had two daughters: Polly born about 1794 and Cynthia before 1797.
Polly married John Perkinson 11 Apr 1814. Cynthia married 1815 David Rutledge.
- Could his father be a John Hundley? Lots of men were named after their father.

John Hundley
- born about 1773/1774
- married before 1803 to Nancy Elizabeth Covington
- He had a son Harrison born 1803 in Henry County, Virginia; and George W. Hundley born 1805/1806 in Henry County, Virginia.
His father was George Hundley born about 1754 and died about 1781 in Pittsylvania, Virginia.

The question is whether these two John Hundleys are the same person? The name is the same. The ages may be the same. They are in the same state. Because the last daughter in the one family was born before 1797, and the first child in the second family was born in 1803, the children are not conflicting in their birth dates. It looks like it would work, but is it the right man?

The odds are against it! A quick check of the 1830 census index for Virginia indicated numerous John Hundleys throughout Virginia. John is an extremely common male name for the time period. Others with his same name are his same age. The name Elizabeth is also very common.

While www.MyTrees.com greatly speeds up the research comparison processes, if we searched using the name John Hundley as the most important criteria, we could find ourselves frustrated because there were so many John Hundelys of about the same age and in the same state. Even within a family in which a son was named for the father, the rough odds was only one in five that "your John" would be named for his father. The odds are typical in other Southern families where it was very likely for at least five sons or more to be born in a family. With so many Hundley/Hundly/Hunly as well as Honly, Unley, Henly spellings of the name, the odds are smaller that the name and time period alone would work to solve this research problem.

How do you solve such a problem? Focus next on the locality. Do you know where in Virginia "your" John was born? If not, where were any of his children or siblings born? Was that locality even in the same county as the John who married Nancy or Elizabeth? And even if it is the same county, can you narrow the locality down further to the specific community (such as a military district, riverway district, etc.) within the county. Even locating John in the same county does not give a reliable yes to, "Are these two Johns the same person?" Did you consider the evolvement of the county? What was its parent county? And then, odds are, you would have to do exhaustive research on John and Nancy/Elizabeth and each of their children to determine what happened to the John that other researchers have not yet been able to locate.

If you don't know where in Virginia "your" John was born, then it is premature to focus your search upon Virginia. The focus needs to be upon the neighborhood in which, you say, "your" John or his children spent their life; in other words, the focus needs to be upon him, Nancy/Elizabeth's family, and every known associate. (And particularly upon every neighbor and associate with a Virginia origin.) There are always links between a man and his prior place of residence -- usually human links. Those links have to be established before you can say that your John of his later residence is the same as John in Virginia.

An exhaustive search where he lived his life, looking for every record he created and every record his neighbors and associates created should yield a clue to when the "Virginia to the later place" move was made, who made it, and where in Virginia they came from.

Don't forget to mention the race or ethnicity of all of these families in your notes. Considering that you are dealing with a South migration in the Revolutionary War period, or just prior to the War of 1812, evidence regarding origin and parentage may be found in military records. These same records might also be the rationale for migration. The fact is, www.MyTrees.com can help you locate those individuals who have posted more valuable "real estate" in the form of "documented" information with their pedigrees. Likewise, you can make your pedigree more "valuable" by posting the sources you have used so people will know what you are missing.

Even if the submitter did not post his/her sources, don't forget to contact the submitter of the information. We recently did that. We asked the question: How do you know that this person was born on this date? Amazingly three people responded to three emails. One was a winner! After looking over our lists of sources and what they said, he noticed he had something we were missing. He stated that he had a copy of a letter written by the person's granddaughter who was twelve years old when her grandfather died. She gave the family stories about the generation that came to America within that grandfather's lifetime. She also gave exact birth dates for several of her siblings, and for those she didn't have the birth dates for, she knew their ages because she was 8, 6, 4, or 2 years younger than they were.

The reality is that without someone who has already done this fundamental work, it will take the level of work outlined above to prove "your" John's parentage. By finding someone who may have a record that exists only in that branch of the family today, you could confidently explore proving what was provided instead of starting from scratch. Visit www.MyTrees.com and see what a time saver to your research it can be!

Article written by Karen Clifford from Genealogy Research Associates. Sponsored MyTrees.com.

Copyright ©: 2011 Karen Clifford. All rights reserved.

No reproduction of this article may be used without the express written permission of the author.

About the Author Karen Clifford

Karen Clifford, AG, is Founder and President of Genealogy Research Associates, Inc., a leading provider of professional research, educational products, and innovative genealogical services. http://www.graonline.com She is an Accredited Genealogist in Midwestern States Research, she has specialized for years in Southern States and Scandinavian Research. Karen has worked as an instructor in the Associates Degree programs in Library Science-Genealogy and Computers at Hartnell College (Salinas, California) and Monterey Peninsula College (Monterey, California). She has authored several family histories and textbooks including Genealogy & Computers for the Complete Beginner; Genealogy & Computers for the Determined Researcher; Genealogy & Computers for the Advanced Researcher; and Becoming an Accredited Genealogist.

Karen has served as Vice-President of the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) and Vice-President of the Utah Genealogical Association (UGA) and is a frequent speaker at major conferences and institutes.. She is a member of the California State Genealogy Alliance, the Association of Professional Genealogists, the National Genealogical Society, and the New England Historic Genealogical Society and was the founding President of the Monterey County Genealogy Society. She has served as Director of UGA's Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy. She has received several awards for her volunteer work in the genealogy community including the FGS Award of Merit and the FGS Outstanding Delegate Award.

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