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Genealogy HowTo
Issue: Sep 7, 2001

It's Back to School Time
By Karen Clifford, AG, FUGA

With summer winding down and life returning to a normal routine, it's time to resume research. Karen Clifford introduces us to one of her star pupils and shares some of his secrets for genealogy research success.

It's back to school for children across America as well as for those of us who are teachers. I received a nice email from a former student by the name of Bud, who is confined to a wheelchair. Since I occasionally picked him up at his home when he was no longer able to drive, he used to let me sit on the back of his electric wheel cart and we would race across campus together.

Bud literally lives to do genealogy today. He wanted to share a research routine with me using the new nation-wide 1880 census transcription CDs available for purchase at www.familysearch.org. When I told him that MyTrees.com had many original 1880 census soundex images on line for the area he was interested in, he was really thrilled since he must do the majority of his research online.

The 1880 census transcription CDs are a secondary source with obvious errors due to difficult handwriting, unusual or unfamiliar names, and other problems that are natural with any extraction project. Thus, users are always encouraged to look at the original source before accepting all information as correct. Or, at a minimum, they should indicate that the information came off of a secondary source so that others who use the information will be alerted to search the original.

While searching the source documents other things might be noticed such as initials, occupations, or titles. Furthermore, specific information regarding the proximity of neighbors, the monetary value of the family, and the type of area they lived in are some other identifying clues. Even if the source document is only an index to the original, spelling errors may be corrected.

Why is the 1880 Census So Important?
For the past twenty years, genealogists have had the 1900 census, fully indexed by state to use for locating relatives. They later obtained the 1910 census partially indexed. If you happened to have relatives in New York, for example, it could be pretty frustrating using an unindexed census. But over the years, a cross-index was made between street addresses and the census enumeration district numbers. With this aid, a person could find their ancestor in a New York City directory and then use the cross-index from the address to the enumeration district. This made it much easier to find the ancestor.

Gratefully, the 1920 census was fully indexed. Going backwards, however, genealogists had a more difficult time. The 1890 census was accidentally destroyed by fire except for a few localities, so this forced genealogists to skip a twenty-year period when so many people were immigrating to, or moving around, America.

Then another hurdle was placed in genealogists' path. The 1880 census was only indexed for those families who had children ten years of age or younger in their family. How could you find grandparents living in a family? How could you find families with teenagers or young adults? It also was only a statewide index, so you had to know what state to begin with. This was sometimes difficult if your jumping off point was twenty years later in 1900. However work has been done and now, an every-name, nationwide index of the 1880 census was just released -- which makes it just that much more important.

The announcement of the release of this index was a big surprise because it had been worked on for over twelve years by tens of thousands of volunteers and had been promised for nearly as many years. It was worth waiting for and is available at most local Family History Centers. You can purchase the whole thing for $49 plus postage, tax, and handling.

Using this index to locate your family is a wonderful finding tool, but don't forget that thousands of the original 1880 soundex images are online at MyTrees.com. They are indexed as well as linked to their original document. They can be viewed as part of your subscription services, or you can spend five minutes extracting some of the images, and view them for free. They are being added to each day by those who do extraction work.

How Do I View the 1880 Census Soundex?
For those cards which have been completed, just log on to your subscription service, go to "Search" and click on "Census Records." The 1880 Census link is listed with all our other censuses on this page.

You will be brought to a Source Document Query screen where you may enter the person's name and a range of years you are looking for. If you already know what state you are looking for, you may search for that state as well.

I was looking for Leticia Vaughn. I had a guess as to where she might be -- her husband had died some years earlier in Tennessee. However, I could not find her in Tennessee so I asked for a search of all states. Since Leticia might be known as Ticia, Letty, or other nicknames, I just searched under the spelling of VAUGHN and I only found:

William Vaughan -- age 82, a father-in-law, and his wife Elizabeth -- age 75, mother-in-law of Creed Carrico in Grayson County, Virginia. William and Elizabeth were parents of Rosemond age 44. I marveled at how this Vaughan family which was not listed on its own was picked up in the index. Three generations of the family were listed but not my Letitia.

While the soundex card clearly spelled "Vaughan" the index card was transcribed as "Vaughn" which is a common error among transcribers. So I next tried entering the spelling VAUGHAN.

Here I found an 82 year old Lettie Vaughan listed as a grandmother of Mary A. Clark, age 47, in Mecklenburg, Virginia. She was the correct age and there were Clarks in the family line as well. Now I needed to determine which child Mary A. Clark descended from to determine if this was the Leticia Vaughn I was seeking.

Be sure to scroll down the page if you do not see your person on the first card. Both of these searches were at the bottom of the second card.

How Do You Obtain Free Search Time?
At the home page look at the tool bar on the left. Under 'Free Member Services" is the option "Free Subscription Time." Click there and open your window up wide to view the entire page. In the upper left hand corner is a link to "name extraction." Click on the word "Source Documents" and spend about ten minutes or more extracting information. Note: This opportunity is no longer available.

You can also earn free search time by uploading your own family with the purpose of sharing with others. Either way, you should be able to take advantage of the source documents feature to search not only the 1880 census soundex information but the Special Collections Archive as well.

Bud's Search Routine
Bud uses four things to accomplish his goal of documenting family members:

First he uses his genealogy computer program to access and alphabetically file his names.

Next, he uses his Windows multi-tasking routines to enable him to have his genealogy computer program, his census index, and his word processor all working at the same time.

Third, he uses the 1880 U.S. Census Index.

Fourth, he uses his WordPerfect or Word program to record his findings.

He then systematically searches one surname at a time or one listing at a time using the genealogy computer program's ability to do advanced focusing on his names and listing them in chronological order by the various states. He had 17 Abbott individuals in his file, and 81 Armstrongs.

Next he loaded the 1880 Census Index CD containing the letter A, or he searches online for those surnames in MyTrees.com. The 1880 Census CD index came up with a listing of 31,769 individuals listed with the surname Armstrong. Since that was too many to search, he could look at the date ranges and localities to limit the search.

He would then study the genealogy computer program's file by toggling on the lower power bar using Window's multi-tasking routine shifting between the genealogy program, the 1880 census viewer, and/or the MyTrees index. He would study the name until he could find one he felt should appear in the census.

Remember, the women will be listed by the married name of the spouse they were married to in 1880, or if single by their maiden name.

As he would view the transcribed census of the census soundex card, he was watching for all matching identifiers including the name (William Armstrong might be Willie, Wm., Bill, W., etc.); and the age. But there were other identifiers as well, such as the name of his children (if he had any), the name of his spouse, and his place of birth. If two William H. Armstrongs were of about the same age, only the one born in Virginia could be his.

He would then copy the information into his word processing program (if he wasn't sure how the person was related as yet or if he wanted to write some notes to himself about it) or he would copy it directly into his genealogy computer program if he recognized it as a sure match.

Conclusion
Whether you are confined to a wheelchair or not, there are many sources available today to help you do research from home. MyTrees.com can speed up the research process as you extract a few names for other people who may be doing the same thing for you.

Article written by Karen Clifford from Genealogy Research Associates. Sponsored by MyTrees.com.

Copyright ©: 2011 Karen Clifford. All rights reserved.

No reproduction of this article may be used without the express written permission of the author.

Newsletters

Select Newsletter by Issue or Topic:

Genealogy HowTo
Issue: Sep 7, 2001

It's Back to School Time
By Karen Clifford, AG, FUGA

With summer winding down and life returning to a normal routine, it's time to resume research. Karen Clifford introduces us to one of her star pupils and shares some of his secrets for genealogy research success.

It's back to school for children across America as well as for those of us who are teachers. I received a nice email from a former student by the name of Bud, who is confined to a wheelchair. Since I occasionally picked him up at his home when he was no longer able to drive, he used to let me sit on the back of his electric wheel cart and we would race across campus together.

Bud literally lives to do genealogy today. He wanted to share a research routine with me using the new nation-wide 1880 census transcription CDs available for purchase at www.familysearch.org. When I told him that MyTrees.com had many original 1880 census soundex images on line for the area he was interested in, he was really thrilled since he must do the majority of his research online.

The 1880 census transcription CDs are a secondary source with obvious errors due to difficult handwriting, unusual or unfamiliar names, and other problems that are natural with any extraction project. Thus, users are always encouraged to look at the original source before accepting all information as correct. Or, at a minimum, they should indicate that the information came off of a secondary source so that others who use the information will be alerted to search the original.

While searching the source documents other things might be noticed such as initials, occupations, or titles. Furthermore, specific information regarding the proximity of neighbors, the monetary value of the family, and the type of area they lived in are some other identifying clues. Even if the source document is only an index to the original, spelling errors may be corrected.

Why is the 1880 Census So Important?
For the past twenty years, genealogists have had the 1900 census, fully indexed by state to use for locating relatives. They later obtained the 1910 census partially indexed. If you happened to have relatives in New York, for example, it could be pretty frustrating using an unindexed census. But over the years, a cross-index was made between street addresses and the census enumeration district numbers. With this aid, a person could find their ancestor in a New York City directory and then use the cross-index from the address to the enumeration district. This made it much easier to find the ancestor.

Gratefully, the 1920 census was fully indexed. Going backwards, however, genealogists had a more difficult time. The 1890 census was accidentally destroyed by fire except for a few localities, so this forced genealogists to skip a twenty-year period when so many people were immigrating to, or moving around, America.

Then another hurdle was placed in genealogists' path. The 1880 census was only indexed for those families who had children ten years of age or younger in their family. How could you find grandparents living in a family? How could you find families with teenagers or young adults? It also was only a statewide index, so you had to know what state to begin with. This was sometimes difficult if your jumping off point was twenty years later in 1900. However work has been done and now, an every-name, nationwide index of the 1880 census was just released -- which makes it just that much more important.

The announcement of the release of this index was a big surprise because it had been worked on for over twelve years by tens of thousands of volunteers and had been promised for nearly as many years. It was worth waiting for and is available at most local Family History Centers. You can purchase the whole thing for $49 plus postage, tax, and handling.

Using this index to locate your family is a wonderful finding tool, but don't forget that thousands of the original 1880 soundex images are online at MyTrees.com. They are indexed as well as linked to their original document. They can be viewed as part of your subscription services, or you can spend five minutes extracting some of the images, and view them for free. They are being added to each day by those who do extraction work.

How Do I View the 1880 Census Soundex?
For those cards which have been completed, just log on to your subscription service, go to "Search" and click on "Census Records." The 1880 Census link is listed with all our other censuses on this page.

You will be brought to a Source Document Query screen where you may enter the person's name and a range of years you are looking for. If you already know what state you are looking for, you may search for that state as well.

I was looking for Leticia Vaughn. I had a guess as to where she might be -- her husband had died some years earlier in Tennessee. However, I could not find her in Tennessee so I asked for a search of all states. Since Leticia might be known as Ticia, Letty, or other nicknames, I just searched under the spelling of VAUGHN and I only found:

William Vaughan -- age 82, a father-in-law, and his wife Elizabeth -- age 75, mother-in-law of Creed Carrico in Grayson County, Virginia. William and Elizabeth were parents of Rosemond age 44. I marveled at how this Vaughan family which was not listed on its own was picked up in the index. Three generations of the family were listed but not my Letitia.

While the soundex card clearly spelled "Vaughan" the index card was transcribed as "Vaughn" which is a common error among transcribers. So I next tried entering the spelling VAUGHAN.

Here I found an 82 year old Lettie Vaughan listed as a grandmother of Mary A. Clark, age 47, in Mecklenburg, Virginia. She was the correct age and there were Clarks in the family line as well. Now I needed to determine which child Mary A. Clark descended from to determine if this was the Leticia Vaughn I was seeking.

Be sure to scroll down the page if you do not see your person on the first card. Both of these searches were at the bottom of the second card.

How Do You Obtain Free Search Time?
At the home page look at the tool bar on the left. Under 'Free Member Services" is the option "Free Subscription Time." Click there and open your window up wide to view the entire page. In the upper left hand corner is a link to "name extraction." Click on the word "Source Documents" and spend about ten minutes or more extracting information. Note: This opportunity is no longer available.

You can also earn free search time by uploading your own family with the purpose of sharing with others. Either way, you should be able to take advantage of the source documents feature to search not only the 1880 census soundex information but the Special Collections Archive as well.

Bud's Search Routine
Bud uses four things to accomplish his goal of documenting family members:

First he uses his genealogy computer program to access and alphabetically file his names.

Next, he uses his Windows multi-tasking routines to enable him to have his genealogy computer program, his census index, and his word processor all working at the same time.

Third, he uses the 1880 U.S. Census Index.

Fourth, he uses his WordPerfect or Word program to record his findings.

He then systematically searches one surname at a time or one listing at a time using the genealogy computer program's ability to do advanced focusing on his names and listing them in chronological order by the various states. He had 17 Abbott individuals in his file, and 81 Armstrongs.

Next he loaded the 1880 Census Index CD containing the letter A, or he searches online for those surnames in MyTrees.com. The 1880 Census CD index came up with a listing of 31,769 individuals listed with the surname Armstrong. Since that was too many to search, he could look at the date ranges and localities to limit the search.

He would then study the genealogy computer program's file by toggling on the lower power bar using Window's multi-tasking routine shifting between the genealogy program, the 1880 census viewer, and/or the MyTrees index. He would study the name until he could find one he felt should appear in the census.

Remember, the women will be listed by the married name of the spouse they were married to in 1880, or if single by their maiden name.

As he would view the transcribed census of the census soundex card, he was watching for all matching identifiers including the name (William Armstrong might be Willie, Wm., Bill, W., etc.); and the age. But there were other identifiers as well, such as the name of his children (if he had any), the name of his spouse, and his place of birth. If two William H. Armstrongs were of about the same age, only the one born in Virginia could be his.

He would then copy the information into his word processing program (if he wasn't sure how the person was related as yet or if he wanted to write some notes to himself about it) or he would copy it directly into his genealogy computer program if he recognized it as a sure match.

Conclusion
Whether you are confined to a wheelchair or not, there are many sources available today to help you do research from home. MyTrees.com can speed up the research process as you extract a few names for other people who may be doing the same thing for you.

Article written by Karen Clifford from Genealogy Research Associates. Sponsored by MyTrees.com.

Copyright ©: 2011 Karen Clifford. All rights reserved.

No reproduction of this article may be used without the express written permission of the author.

Newsletters

Select Newsletter by Issue or Topic:

Genealogy HowTo
Issue: Sep 7, 2001

It's Back to School Time
By Karen Clifford, AG, FUGA

With summer winding down and life returning to a normal routine, it's time to resume research. Karen Clifford introduces us to one of her star pupils and shares some of his secrets for genealogy research success.

It's back to school for children across America as well as for those of us who are teachers. I received a nice email from a former student by the name of Bud, who is confined to a wheelchair. Since I occasionally picked him up at his home when he was no longer able to drive, he used to let me sit on the back of his electric wheel cart and we would race across campus together.

Bud literally lives to do genealogy today. He wanted to share a research routine with me using the new nation-wide 1880 census transcription CDs available for purchase at www.familysearch.org. When I told him that MyTrees.com had many original 1880 census soundex images on line for the area he was interested in, he was really thrilled since he must do the majority of his research online.

The 1880 census transcription CDs are a secondary source with obvious errors due to difficult handwriting, unusual or unfamiliar names, and other problems that are natural with any extraction project. Thus, users are always encouraged to look at the original source before accepting all information as correct. Or, at a minimum, they should indicate that the information came off of a secondary source so that others who use the information will be alerted to search the original.

While searching the source documents other things might be noticed such as initials, occupations, or titles. Furthermore, specific information regarding the proximity of neighbors, the monetary value of the family, and the type of area they lived in are some other identifying clues. Even if the source document is only an index to the original, spelling errors may be corrected.

Why is the 1880 Census So Important?
For the past twenty years, genealogists have had the 1900 census, fully indexed by state to use for locating relatives. They later obtained the 1910 census partially indexed. If you happened to have relatives in New York, for example, it could be pretty frustrating using an unindexed census. But over the years, a cross-index was made between street addresses and the census enumeration district numbers. With this aid, a person could find their ancestor in a New York City directory and then use the cross-index from the address to the enumeration district. This made it much easier to find the ancestor.

Gratefully, the 1920 census was fully indexed. Going backwards, however, genealogists had a more difficult time. The 1890 census was accidentally destroyed by fire except for a few localities, so this forced genealogists to skip a twenty-year period when so many people were immigrating to, or moving around, America.

Then another hurdle was placed in genealogists' path. The 1880 census was only indexed for those families who had children ten years of age or younger in their family. How could you find grandparents living in a family? How could you find families with teenagers or young adults? It also was only a statewide index, so you had to know what state to begin with. This was sometimes difficult if your jumping off point was twenty years later in 1900. However work has been done and now, an every-name, nationwide index of the 1880 census was just released -- which makes it just that much more important.

The announcement of the release of this index was a big surprise because it had been worked on for over twelve years by tens of thousands of volunteers and had been promised for nearly as many years. It was worth waiting for and is available at most local Family History Centers. You can purchase the whole thing for $49 plus postage, tax, and handling.

Using this index to locate your family is a wonderful finding tool, but don't forget that thousands of the original 1880 soundex images are online at MyTrees.com. They are indexed as well as linked to their original document. They can be viewed as part of your subscription services, or you can spend five minutes extracting some of the images, and view them for free. They are being added to each day by those who do extraction work.

How Do I View the 1880 Census Soundex?
For those cards which have been completed, just log on to your subscription service, go to "Search" and click on "Census Records." The 1880 Census link is listed with all our other censuses on this page.

You will be brought to a Source Document Query screen where you may enter the person's name and a range of years you are looking for. If you already know what state you are looking for, you may search for that state as well.

I was looking for Leticia Vaughn. I had a guess as to where she might be -- her husband had died some years earlier in Tennessee. However, I could not find her in Tennessee so I asked for a search of all states. Since Leticia might be known as Ticia, Letty, or other nicknames, I just searched under the spelling of VAUGHN and I only found:

William Vaughan -- age 82, a father-in-law, and his wife Elizabeth -- age 75, mother-in-law of Creed Carrico in Grayson County, Virginia. William and Elizabeth were parents of Rosemond age 44. I marveled at how this Vaughan family which was not listed on its own was picked up in the index. Three generations of the family were listed but not my Letitia.

While the soundex card clearly spelled "Vaughan" the index card was transcribed as "Vaughn" which is a common error among transcribers. So I next tried entering the spelling VAUGHAN.

Here I found an 82 year old Lettie Vaughan listed as a grandmother of Mary A. Clark, age 47, in Mecklenburg, Virginia. She was the correct age and there were Clarks in the family line as well. Now I needed to determine which child Mary A. Clark descended from to determine if this was the Leticia Vaughn I was seeking.

Be sure to scroll down the page if you do not see your person on the first card. Both of these searches were at the bottom of the second card.

How Do You Obtain Free Search Time?
At the home page look at the tool bar on the left. Under 'Free Member Services" is the option "Free Subscription Time." Click there and open your window up wide to view the entire page. In the upper left hand corner is a link to "name extraction." Click on the word "Source Documents" and spend about ten minutes or more extracting information. Note: This opportunity is no longer available.

You can also earn free search time by uploading your own family with the purpose of sharing with others. Either way, you should be able to take advantage of the source documents feature to search not only the 1880 census soundex information but the Special Collections Archive as well.

Bud's Search Routine
Bud uses four things to accomplish his goal of documenting family members:

First he uses his genealogy computer program to access and alphabetically file his names.

Next, he uses his Windows multi-tasking routines to enable him to have his genealogy computer program, his census index, and his word processor all working at the same time.

Third, he uses the 1880 U.S. Census Index.

Fourth, he uses his WordPerfect or Word program to record his findings.

He then systematically searches one surname at a time or one listing at a time using the genealogy computer program's ability to do advanced focusing on his names and listing them in chronological order by the various states. He had 17 Abbott individuals in his file, and 81 Armstrongs.

Next he loaded the 1880 Census Index CD containing the letter A, or he searches online for those surnames in MyTrees.com. The 1880 Census CD index came up with a listing of 31,769 individuals listed with the surname Armstrong. Since that was too many to search, he could look at the date ranges and localities to limit the search.

He would then study the genealogy computer program's file by toggling on the lower power bar using Window's multi-tasking routine shifting between the genealogy program, the 1880 census viewer, and/or the MyTrees index. He would study the name until he could find one he felt should appear in the census.

Remember, the women will be listed by the married name of the spouse they were married to in 1880, or if single by their maiden name.

As he would view the transcribed census of the census soundex card, he was watching for all matching identifiers including the name (William Armstrong might be Willie, Wm., Bill, W., etc.); and the age. But there were other identifiers as well, such as the name of his children (if he had any), the name of his spouse, and his place of birth. If two William H. Armstrongs were of about the same age, only the one born in Virginia could be his.

He would then copy the information into his word processing program (if he wasn't sure how the person was related as yet or if he wanted to write some notes to himself about it) or he would copy it directly into his genealogy computer program if he recognized it as a sure match.

Conclusion
Whether you are confined to a wheelchair or not, there are many sources available today to help you do research from home. MyTrees.com can speed up the research process as you extract a few names for other people who may be doing the same thing for you.

Article written by Karen Clifford from Genealogy Research Associates. Sponsored by MyTrees.com.

Copyright ©: 2011 Karen Clifford. All rights reserved.

No reproduction of this article may be used without the express written permission of the author.

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